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Jun 15, 2015 11:00 AM

Reward Announced in 2014 Murder Case

The FBI is announcing a $5,000 reward for information that leads to an arrest in the murder of Theresa Dashewich, a 47-year-old woman who disappeared from a Montana truck stop a year ago and whose ...

Reward Announced in 2014 Murder Case

The FBI is announcing a $5,000 reward for information that leads to an arrest in the murder of Theresa Dashewich, a 47-year-old woman who disappeared from a Montana truck stop a year ago and whose body was found several days later and 375 miles away in a culvert off a South Dakota interstate highway.

The Bureau’s reward is in addition to the $5,000 reward being offered by the South Dakota Division of Criminal Investigation, the lead investigating agency. South Dakota officials requested the FBI’s operational assistance in identifying the person or persons responsible for Dashewich’s death because of the interstate nature of the case. The case was also added to our Highway Serial Killings Initiative, through which we assist on investigations involving violent crime victims with some nexus to our nation’s highways.

Dashewich, an Ohio native who led a transient lifestyle and often frequented truck stops, was last seen in the early morning hours of June 14, 2014, talking to truck drivers outside a Flying J truck stop in Billings, Montana. She was wearing a gray t-shirt, navy sweatpants, and white tennis shoes, and she carried a duffel bag. At approximately 8 a.m. on June 14, 2014, a person resembling Dashewich was observed walking away from the Flying J toward the eastbound on-ramp of Interstate 90. Her body was discovered on June 17 along I-90 by a passing motorist—she had been beaten to death, and investigators believe she had been held against her will, possibly in a large vehicle.

Anyone with information on the case is asked to call 1-800-CALL-FBI (225-5324), or contact the nearest FBI field office or American Embassy or Consulate. Help bring closure to the victim’s family and the responsible perpetrator(s) to justice.

Seeking Information poster | Podcast

Jun 12, 2015 04:00 PM

FBI Safe Online Surfing Internet Challenge

The FBI’s Safe Online Surfing Internet Challenge—a free, fun, and informative program that promotes cyber citizenship by educating students in third to eighth grades on the essentials of online ...

FBI Safe Online Surfing Internet Challenge

The FBI’s Safe Online Surfing Internet Challenge—a free, fun, and informative program that promotes cyber citizenship by educating students in third to eighth grades on the essentials of online security—just finished its third school year, with record results. A total of 275,656 students completed the exams—more than triple the previous year. The competition included 5,053 schools in 49 states, D.C., Puerto Rico, and the Northern Mariana Islands.

Full story

Jun 09, 2015 12:30 PM

The Case of the Corrupt Coin Dealer

Inside the case of a rare coin and precious metals dealer who stole from his elderly clients.

The Case of the Corrupt Coin Dealer

Gold Coins
Financial fraud comes in all shapes and sizes. And while corporate criminals, inside traders, and Ponzi schemers often cause their victims to lose millions of dollars, the case of the crooked coin dealer from New York illustrates that even relatively small-time fraudsters must answer for their crimes.

Chrysanthos Nicholas, a 55-year-old rare coin and precious metals dealer, will be spending the next 27 months in federal prison for stealing more than $260,000 from some of his elderly customers.

Full story

Jun 05, 2015 10:00 AM

Serial Armed Robber Gets Substantial Prison Term

A series of armed robberies of businesses—one of which ended with a customer getting shot—sparked a joint law enforcement effort that resulted in getting a dangerous criminal off the streets for a ...

Serial Armed Robber Gets Substantial Prison Term

It was a highly effective combination of local and federal resources. A 38-year-old man was identified by local police as the suspect in a series of frightening armed robberies of businesses in the Birmingham, Alabama area, one of which ended with a customer getting shot. Local authorities contacted the FBI’s Birmingham Field Office with a request for assistance—they wanted to see if their suspect could be charged under the federal Hobbs Act, taking advantage of its harsher penalties.

The multi-agency investigation that followed led to this particular suspect—Jamey Lee Matthews—pleading guilty to four counts of robbery under the Hobbs Act. And just last month, he received a 25-year federal prison term. The judge also ordered him to pay $208,000 in restitution to the man he shot and to the stores he robbed.

Full story

Jun 04, 2015 06:15 PM

FBI Investigating OPM Cyber Intrusion

The FBI is investigating a cyber intrusion affecting the information technology and data systems of the federal government’s Office of Personnel Management, or OPM.

FBI Investigating OPM Cyber Intrusion

The FBI is investigating a cyber intrusion affecting the information technology and data systems of the federal government’s Office of Personnel Management, or OPM.

In a June 4 press release notifying federal employees of the incident, OPM said the agency has partnered with the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI to determine the intrusion’s full impact on federal personnel. OPM said it will send notifications to approximately four million individuals whose personal information may have been compromised.

OPM’s press release included guidance for affected individuals, as well as tips to avoid becoming a victim.

In a June 4 statement confirming its role in the investigation, the FBI said, “We take all potential threats to public and private sector systems seriously and will continue to investigate and hold accountable those who pose a threat in cyberspace.”

OPM press release | FBI statement

Jun 03, 2015 12:00 PM

Counterterrorism Executive Briefs Congress on Latest Threats

Assistant Director Michael Steinbach, appearing today before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Homeland Security Committee, discussed “the widespread reach of terrorists’ influence, which transcends ...

Counterterrorism Executive Briefs Congress on Latest Threats

Assistant Director Michael Steinbach, appearing today before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Homeland Security Committee, discussed “the widespread reach of terrorists’ influence, which transcends geographic boundaries like never before” as a result of terrorists’ continuing use of technology to communicate and to recruit.

According to Steinbach, the FBI continues to focus on identifying individuals trying to join the ranks of foreign fighters traveling in support of ISIL and homegrown violent extremists who may aspire to attack America from within. Both threats are high priorities for the Bureau and for the U.S. Intelligence Community as a whole. But we are challenged by the widespread and aggressive use of the Internet and social media by terror groups—and in particular, by ISIL, which has “constructed a narrative that touches on all facets of life—from career opportunities to family life to a sense of community.” And while there is no set profile for the “susceptible consumer of this propaganda,” Steinbach said that one trend continues to rise—the inspired youth.

He also talked about the Going Dark issue—especially as it relates to terrorism—as some of the online conversations between terrorists and those they are targeting for recruitment take place through private messaging platforms. Going Dark refers to the gap between the laws and technology designed to allow for the lawful intercept of communications content by law enforcement and the changing forms of Internet communications. Steinbach explained, “It’s imperative that the FBI and all law enforcement organizations understand the latest communication tools and are positioned to identify and prevent terror attacks in the homeland.”

Full testimony

Jun 02, 2015 04:00 PM

Financial Fraud

Like many successful con men, William C. Lange made people believe that he really cared about them—even as he looked them in the eye and took their money. But Lange and his co-conspirators operated ...

Financial Fraud

Like many successful con men, William C. Lange made people believe that he really cared about them—even as he looked them in the eye and took their money. But Lange and his co-conspirators operated two companies that were based on lies—and the lies caught up with him: The 67-year-old Washington state businessman was recently sentenced to 22 years in federal prison for swindling more than 300 investors in the U.S. and overseas out of $10 million.

Full story

May 29, 2015 03:45 PM

Taken for a Ride

The trip to Hawaii for 270 high school band members and their chaperones was supposed to be the crescendo of months of performances, fundraisers, and saving to book the arrangements. But the music ...

Taken for a Ride

Tuba Players


The trip to Hawaii for 270 high school band members and their chaperones was supposed to be the crescendo of months of performances, fundraisers, and saving to book the arrangements. But the music stopped when the band’s travel agent admitted he’d duped them to the tune of more than $272,000.

Full story

May 27, 2015 11:15 AM

International Soccer Officials Indicted

The U.S. government this morning unsealed indictments in a New York federal court against high-ranking officials and corporate executives affiliated with FIFA, the governing body of international ...

International Soccer Officials Indicted

Soccer Ball on Field


The U.S. government this morning unsealed indictments in a New York federal court against high-ranking officials and corporate executives affiliated with FIFA, the governing body of international soccer, for their roles in a decades-long scheme to corrupt the sport through bribes, kickbacks, and other criminal activity aimed at controlling lucrative marketing rights to international tournaments such as the World Cup.

 Nine FIFA officials—including two current vice presidents—along with five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud, and money laundering, among other offenses.

Full story

May 22, 2015 12:30 PM

FBI Releases New Version of Child ID App

The FBI today is announcing a reboot of its popular Child ID App, which provides parents with an easy way to electronically store their children’s pictures and vital information to have on hand in ...

FBI Releases New Version of Child ID App

Child ID App LogoThe FBI today is announcing a reboot of its popular Child ID App, which provides parents with an easy way to electronically store their children’s pictures and vital information to have on hand in case their kids go missing.

The application, which works on most Apple and Android smartphones and tablets, allows users to store up-to-date images and physical descriptions—like height, weight, birthmarks, etc.—that could help responders in the event of an emergency. The information is stored only on your device—not with your mobile provider or the FBI.

The latest version of the Child ID App contains updated features, including high-resolution image capability, a default recipient field (where you can enter your local police department’s e-mail address, for example), and optional automatic reminders to update your children’s profiles.

Current users of the Child ID App are encouraged to download the latest version for improved performance and capabilities. Please note that if you had been using an older version of the app (prior to 2.0), you will need to re-enter all relevant information after installing the update.

The app has been downloaded more than 250,000 times since it was released, first on iTunes in 2011 and then for the Android operating system in 2012. The current version, released in April, has been downloaded more than 50,000 times onto devices around the world.

The Child ID App also includes tips on keeping children safe as well as specific guidance on what to do in those first few crucial hours after a child goes missing.

For more information and to download: