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Oct 20, 2014 01:00 PM

Cyber Security: Task Force Takes ‘Whole Government’ Approach

In today’s virtual world, it is well known that cyber crime can jeopardize our privacy, our economy, and even our national security. Less well known is an organization—the National Cyber ...

Cyber Security: Task Force Takes ‘Whole Government’ Approach

Hackers compromising banking and retail networks to steal consumers’ personal information. Foreign actors virtually accessing our trade secrets. Criminal groups lining their pockets by exploiting any online vulnerability they can find.

In today’s virtual world, it is well known that cyber crime can jeopardize our privacy, our economy, and even our national security. Less well known is an organization—the National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force—that is working around the clock to fight the threat.

Full story

Oct 17, 2014 01:15 PM

Color of Law: Agent Exposes Civil Rights Crimes in Alabama Prison

There was never any dispute that Rocrast Mack, a 24-year-old serving time on drug charges in a state prison in Alabama, died at the hands of corrections officers in 2010. What wasn’t immediately ...

Color of Law: Agent Exposes Civil Rights Crimes in Alabama Prison


There was never any dispute that Rocrast Mack, a 24-year-old serving time on drug charges in a state prison in Alabama, died at the hands of corrections officers in 2010. What wasn’t immediately clear was how and why the inmate sustained a lethal beating.

What was known was this: On August 4, 2010, a female corrections officer confronted Mack in his bunk, accused him of inappropriate behavior, and struck him. Mack retaliated, the officer radioed for help, more officers arrived, and Mack was beaten in three separate prison locations over a 40-minute period. He died the next day from his injuries. Guards claimed Mack was fighting them throughout the ordeal and sustained his fatal injuries in a fall.

An investigator from Alabama’s State Bureau of Investigation thought the stories didn’t add up and called the FBI, which investigates cases of abuse of authority—or color of law—and other civil rights violations. When Special Agent Susan Hanson opened her case at the Ventress Correctional Facility, it was evident her biggest challenge would be getting to the truth.

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Oct 16, 2014 01:00 PM

Director Comey Discusses Impact of Emerging Technology on Public Safety

James Comey, speaking today at the Brookings Institution in Washington D.C., talked about the challenges that law enforcement face as we carry out our duty to keep Americans safe while addressing the ...

Director Comey Discusses Impact of Emerging Technology on Public Safety


James Comey, speaking today at the Brookings Institution in Washington D.C., talked about the challenges that law enforcement face as we carry out our duty to keep Americans safe while addressing the issue of “Going Dark.” He explained that while technology has become the tool of choice for some very dangerous people, the law hasn’t kept pace with technology and the resulting disconnect has created a significant public safety issue. Said Comey, “Those charged with protecting people aren’t always able to access the evidence we need to prosecute crime and prevent terrorism. We have the legal authority to intercept and access communications and information pursuant to court order, but we often lack the technical ability to do so.”

Comey cited a number of investigative examples where critical evidence came from smartphones, hard drives, and online communication, and he stressed the importance of assistance and cooperation from private sector partners in these matters. He also said that Bureau employees are sworn to protect both security and liberty. “It isn’t a question of conflict,” according to Comey. “We must care deeply about protecting liberty through due process of law, while also safeguarding the citizens we serve—in every investigation.”

Full text of Comey’s speech

Oct 14, 2014 01:30 PM

Sex Trafficker Receives 40-Year Sentence

It is yet another example of how social media can be dangerous for young people. Recently, a Houston man was sentenced to 40 years in prison on child sex trafficking charges after identifying and ...

Sex Trafficker Receives 40-Year Sentence

Shadowed Hands on Dark Laptop Keyboard
It is yet another example of how social media can be dangerous for young people. Recently, a Houston man was sentenced to 40 years in prison on child sex trafficking charges after identifying and contacting young girls through social media platforms and then luring them into prostitution.

Full story

Oct 14, 2014 11:30 AM

Cyber’s Most Wanted: We Need Your Help

During National Cyber Security Awareness Month, we’d like to call your attention to the nearly 30 individuals currently featured on the Cyber’s Most Wanted section of the FBI’s public website in the ...

Cyber’s Most Wanted: We Need Your Help

Cyber’s Most Wanted Section Screengrab

They are wanted on a variety of charges—like installing insidious malware on unsuspecting victims’ computers, hacking into company networks and stealing trade secrets and user identity data, selling fraudulent computer security programs and other bogus software, manufacturing spyware to intercept private communications, and illegally accessing financial accounts and stealing the funds. But these individual criminals all have one thing in common—they are fugitives from justice who are currently featured on the Cyber’s Most Wanted section of the FBI’s public website.

And during National Cyber Security Awareness Month, we’d like to call your attention to these nearly 30 individuals in the hope that someone, somewhere, has information that could lead to their apprehension.

Among the FBI’s wanted cyber fugitives are:

  • Five members of China’s People’s Liberation Army indicted on charges of illegally penetrating the networks of six U.S. companies and stealing proprietary information, including trade secrets;
  • The Russian administrator and other co-conspirators wanted in connection with an alleged scheme to install the Zeus malware on unsuspecting victims’ computers and capture bank account numbers, passwords, personal identification numbers, and other information needed to log into online bank accounts and make unauthorized transfers;
  • A New York-born man allegedly responsible for stealing the identities of 40,000 people and then using the stolen information to siphon funds from their brokerage or bank accounts and purchase expensive electronic items with their credit;
  • Two Pakistani nationals wanted for their alleged involvement in an international telecommunications scheme that defrauded unsuspecting individuals, companies, and government entities in both the United States and abroad out of more than $50 million by compromising business telephone systems; and
  • An El Salvadoran national allegedly involved in manufacturing spyware which was used to intercept the private communications of hundreds, if not thousands, of victims.

The FBI’s Most Wanted program is best known for its Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list, which was established more than 60 years ago and has become a symbol of the FBI’s crime-fighting ability around the world. But the Bureau highlights other wanted fugitives as well—terrorists, white-collar criminals, and increasingly, those who commit cyber crimes.

So take a look at our Cyber’s Most Wanted webpage, and if you have any information concerning any of these individuals—or any FBI wanted fugitive—please contact your nearest FBI office or nearest American Embassy or Consulate.

Cyber’s Most Wanted |Ten Most Wanted Fugitives | Most Wanted Terrorists | White-Collar Criminals | More Most Wanted Fugitives

Oct 10, 2014 10:00 AM

New Research Aims to Help Investigators Solve Serial Murder Cases

A new study for the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime focuses on a key aspect of serial murder cases: how and where the victims’ bodies are discovered and what that says about ...

New Research Aims to Help Investigators Solve Serial Murder Cases

Cover of Serial Murder studyA new study for the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime focuses on a key aspect of serial murder cases: how and where the victims’ bodies are discovered and what that says about the killers.

The study, Serial Murder: Pathways for Investigations, is an analysis of details from hundreds of serial murder cases to help investigators better understand these terrible crimes—and be better equipped to solve them.

“What we tried to do was give investigators working these cases a common place to start, which is the body,” said Bob Morton, a recently retired special agent formerly with our Behavioral Analysis Unit. “You work your way back from there to discern offender characteristics and narrow the suspect pool. The body is the only constant in the crime,” he explained. “Lots of other things can change, but how you find that victim is not going to change.”

If the victim was a prostitute, for example, and the body was left where the murder occurred, that may offer certain clues about the killer. If the body was hidden at a distance from the murder site, that may offer different clues. The study’s statistical data was drawn from 480 U.S. serial murder cases involving 92 offenders over a period of nearly five decades. Morton believes the study’s findings could be a “game changer” for investigators working unsolved cases.

Full story | View study

Oct 09, 2014 10:00 AM

Recalling the Brady Gang

It’s a historical moment that brings us back 80 years—the end of the manhunt for America’s so-called Public Enemy Number One, John Dillinger. It’s also the subject of this week’s Gotcha podcast, ...

The Brady Gang, Part 1 


It’s a historical moment that brings us back 80 years—the end of the manhunt for America’s so-called Public Enemy Number One, John Dillinger. It’s also the subject of this week’s Gotcha podcast, which features closed FBI cases.

Dillinger and his gang made headlines in the Gangster Era for their murders, bank robberies, and other crimes. One fateful night in 1934, agents gunned down Dillinger outside of a Chicago movie theater as the outlaw reached for his gun.

With Dillinger dead, a new gang of bad guys looking to make a name for themselves came onto the scene.

"One urban legend has it that they said, 'We're going to make the Dillinger gang look like pikers.'" said FBI Historian Dr. John Fox.

Alfred Brady, James Dalhover, and Clarence Shaffer formed the Brady gang.

Their goal was to enrich themselves," Fox said. "They wanted money to live an easy life and didn't want to work at it and were happy to rob whoever they could.

Did the Brady gang give Dillinger’s gang a run for their stolen money? On the next Gotcha, hear more from the FBI historian.

Oct 07, 2014 02:15 PM

Help Identify Individuals Traveling Overseas for Combat

The FBI is asking for the public’s help identifying individuals who have traveled—or are planning to travel—overseas to engage in combat alongside terrorist organizations. The FBI is also seeking ...

Help Identify Individuals Traveling Overseas for Combat


The FBI is asking for the public’s help identifying individuals who have traveled—or are planning to travel—overseas to engage in combat alongside terrorist organizations.

The FBI is also seeking information about the identity of an English-speaking individual and others seen in a propaganda video released last month by the group calling itself the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL.

A form for submitting potential tips and leads has been established at www.fbi.gov/ISILtips.

Full story

Oct 06, 2014 12:00 PM

IC3: The Front Door for Reporting Internet Crime

During National Cyber Security Awareness Month, we’d like to take the opportunity to remind everyone that the best way to report Internet-related crimes—which often involve false or fraudulent claims ...

IC3: The Front Door for Reporting Internet Crime

NCSAM 2014 Thin Banner

During National Cyber Security Awareness Month, we’d like to take the opportunity to remind everyone that the best way to report Internet-related crimes—which often involve false or fraudulent claims to consumers—is to file a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3).

IC3 Logo (Large)IC3, now in its 15th year of operation, is a partnership between the FBI and the National White Collar Crime Center. Submissions to this central hub for Internet-related crime complaints can not only lead to culprits getting caught but also help identify regional, national, or international trends to educate the public about constantly evolving cyber threats and scams.

Once a complaint is filed, it goes into IC3’s extensive database, where it’s reviewed by analysts who use automated matching systems to identify links and commonalities with other complaints. These groups of similar complaints are then referred to the appropriate local, state, federal, tribal, or even international law enforcement agency for potential investigation.

All complaints filed through IC3 are helpful in identifying trends—posted publicly on IC3’s website at www.ic3.gov—and building statistical reports for law enforcement and regulatory agencies that substantiate criminal activity within those agencies’ area of jurisdiction.

So if you think you’ve been victimized online—whether or not you actually lost money—IC3 wants to hear from you.

File an IC3 complaint | Latest IC3 alerts | IC3 Internet crime prevention tips | FBI, This Week podcast

Oct 02, 2014 03:30 PM

National Cyber Security Awareness Month

Every October since 2004, National Cyber Security Awareness Month—administered by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)—reminds us of the importance of protecting not only our individual ...

National Cyber Security Awareness Month

National Cyber Security Awareness Month Graphic

Every October since 2004, National Cyber Security Awareness Month—administered by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)—reminds us of the importance of protecting not only our individual identities, finances, and privacy but also our country’s national security, critical infrastructure, and economy. Cyber security is a responsibility shared by all—the public sector, the private sector, and the general public.

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