U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of Tennessee
(865) 545-4167
October 30, 2014

James Glen Murphy, Jr. Sentenced to 27 Years in Prison for Producing Child Pornography

GREENEVILLE, TN—On Oct. 29, 2014, James Glen Murphy, Jr., 31, of Bristol, Tenn., was sentenced to serve 27 years in prison by the Honorable J. Ronnie Greer, U.S. District Judge. The court also imposed a life term of supervised release with special conditions of release.

In July 2014, Murphy pleaded guilty to a federal grand jury indictment charging him with producing, distributing, and possessing child pornography. In sentencing Murphy, Judge Greer noted the seriousness of the offenses Murphy committed including: the fact that he victimized two identified children; the long-term impact on the two child victims; that in addition to the child pornography Murphy produced, the officers found more than 12,000 still images and more than 80 videos of child pornography; the very harsh impact that such crimes have on the fabric of our community; the need to protect the community; the high risk of recidivism for such crimes; and the need for federal courts to send the message that these are serious crimes which will be punished severely.

The indictment and subsequent conviction of Murphy were the result of an investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bristol Tennessee Police Department. Assistant U.S. Attorney Helen Smith represented the United States.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice. Led by United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

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