Home Seattle Press Releases 2013 ‘Man-in-the-E-Mail’ Fraud Could Victimize Area Businesses

‘Man-in-the-E-Mail’ Fraud Could Victimize Area Businesses
Three Seattle-Area Businesses Targeted in 2013

FBI Seattle December 02, 2013
  • Public Affairs Specialist Ayn S. Dietrich (206) 622-0460

The FBI Seattle Division is aware of a fraud victimizing Washington state-based businesses, nicknamed “man-in-the-e-mail” scheme for being an e-mail variation of a known “man-in-the-middle” scam. The FBI wants the public to learn about this scam in order to avoid being victimized.

In 2013, at least three area companies—in Bellevue, Tukwila, and Seattle—were led to believe they were sending money to an established supply partner in China. In reality, fraudsters intercepted legitimate e-mails between the purchasing and supply companies and then spoofed subsequent e-mails impersonating each company to the other. The fraudulent e-mails directed the purchasing companies to send payments to a new bank account because of a purported audit. The bank accounts belonged to the fraudsters, not the supply companies.

Total loss experienced by the three area companies is roughly $1.65 million. In some cases, the metadata on the spoofed e-mails indicated that they actually originated in Nigeria or South Africa.

Under this scam, both companies in a legitimate business relationship can be victimized. The supplier may first ship out the legitimately ordered products and then never receive payment (because the purchasing company was scammed into paying the scammer-controlled bank account). Or, the purchasing company may first make a payment and then never receive the ordered goods (because the supply company never receives that payment).

Here are some of the ways businesses can reduce their chance of being scammed by this man-in-the- e-mail fraud:

  • Establish other communication channels, such as telephone calls, to verify significant transactions. Arrange this second-factor authentication early in the relationship and outside the e-mail environment to avoid interception by a hacker.
  • Utilize digital signatures in e-mail accounts. Be aware that this will not work with web-based e-mail accounts, and some countries ban or limit the use of encryption.
  • Avoid free, web-based e-mail. Establish a company website domain and use it to establish company e-mail accounts in lieu of free, web-based accounts.
  • Do not use the “Reply” option to respond to any business e-mails. Instead, use the “Forward” option and either type in the correct e-mail address or select it from the e-mail address book to ensure the real e-mail address is used.
  • Delete spam: Immediately delete unsolicited e-mail (spam) from unknown parties. Do not open spam e-mail, click on links in the e-mail, or open attachments.
  • Beware of sudden changes in business practices. For example, if suddenly asked to contact a representative at their personal e-mail address when all previous official correspondencehas been on a company e-mail, verify via other channels that you are still communicating with your legitimate business partner.

If you or your business has been targeted by the man-in-the-e-mail fraud, report it to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) at www.ic3.gov. The following information is helpful to report:

  • Header information from e-mail messages
  • Identifiers for the perpetrator (e.g., name, website, bank account, e-mail addresses)
  • Details on how, why, and when you believe you were defrauded
  • Actual and attempted loss amounts
  • Other relevant information you believe is necessary to support your complaint
  • Reference to the man-in-the-e-mail fraud

Filing a complaint through IC3’s website allows analysts from the FBI to identify leads and patterns from the hundreds of complaints that are received daily. The sheer volume of complaints allows that information to come into view among disparate pieces, which can lead to stronger cases and help zero-in on the major sources of criminal activity. The IC3 then refers the complaints, along with their analyses, to the relevant law enforcement agency for follow-up.

The public can learn about other common scams by visiting http://www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/frauds-from-a-to-z and learn about ways to reduce their risk of being scammed: http://www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/fraud/Internet_fraud.