FBI Initiatives

Interpreting DNA

The FBI offers a wide variety of resources, information, and products for use by the biometrics community. We encourage you to explore this web site to learn more about the FBI’s major biometric initiatives.

FBI Latent Hit of the Year Program 

At the request of the law enforcement community, the FBI developed the “Latent Hit of the Year” award program. The award is presented annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime using the FBI’s IAFIS database. If you are interested in submitting a success story for consideration as “Latent Hit of the Year,” contact the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division at FBILatentHit@leo.gov.

FBI “Latent Hit of the Year” Trailer Video

The trailer video introduces the award, the past winners, and the FBI resources and technology used to solve the cases.

Results: 10 Items

  • Latent Hit of the Year, 2014

    Latent Hit of the Year, 2014

    The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s NGI database. The 2014 award recipient is Trooper Christopher Dolan of the Massachusetts State Police, whose work helped close a 1983 Massachusetts cold case

  • Latent Hit of the Year 2013

    Latent Hit of the Year 2013

    Every year, our Criminal Justice Information Services Division gives its Latent Hit of the Year Award to latent print examiners and/or law enforcement officers who solve a major violent crime using the Bureau’s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System, or IAFIS.

  • Latent Hit of the Year 2012

    Latent Hit of the Year 2012

    Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI's IAFIS database.

  • Latent Hit of the Year 2011 Texas

    Latent Hit of the Year 2011 Texas

    The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI's IAFIS database.

  • Latent Hit of the Year 2010

    Latent Hit of the Year 2010

    Latent Hit of the Year 2010, San Diego

  • Latent Hit of the Year

    Latent Hit of the Year

    Overview of the FBI Latent Hit of the Year, awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI's IAFIS database.

  • Latent Hit of the Year

    Latent Hit of the Year

    The FBI Latent Hit of the Year award was created in response to a request from the local and state law enforcement community for more details on major violent crime cases solved with the assistance of our Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS).

  • Latent Hit of the Year 2009

    Latent Hit of the Year 2009

    A 30-year-old Florida murder case is solved. The award, which goes to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who worked the case, is presented annually at the International Association for Identification conference.

1 - 8 of 10 Results

FBI “Latent Hit of the Year” Winners 

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2007 case involved a murder of an 89-year-old woman in Big Rapids, Michigan.

Greg Michaud
Latent Hit of the Year 2007

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2010 case involved the murder of a man who was stabbed more than 50 times in his San Diego, California home in January 1972.

Dorie Savage
Latent Hit of the Year 2010

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2011 case involved the murder of a woman at an abandoned gas station in Houston in 1969.

Jill Kinkade
Latent Hit of the Year 2011

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2008 case involved a murder in Escondido, California in 1977.

Hoi Lui
Latent Hit of the Year 2008

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2010 case involved the murder of a man who was stabbed more than 50 times in his San Diego, California home in January 1972.

Gloria Pasqual
Latent Hit of the Year 2010

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2012 case involved the murder of a man in his apartment in downtown Omaha in 1978.

Doug Herout
Latent Hit of the Year 2012

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2009 case involved the murder of a man inside his home in Bird Key, Florida in October 1978.

Jocelyn Masten
Latent Hit of the Year 2009

John Tefft of the San Diego Police Department, was one of the winners of the Latent Hit of the Year in 2010. Tefft, who was lead detective in the murder of a man in San Diego, is now retired. See https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/news/stories/2010/october/latent_102510/latent_102510 for more information.

John Tefft
Latent Hit of the Year 2010

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2012 case involved the murder of a man in his apartment in downtown Omaha in 1978.

Laura Casey
Latent Hit of the Year 2012

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2009 case involved the murder of a man inside his home in Bird Key, Florida in October 1978.

Pat Robinson
Latent Hit of the Year 2009

The FBI Latent Hit of the Year is awarded annually to an outstanding latent examiner or officer who solved a major violent crime by using the FBI’s IAFIS database. The 2011 case involved the murder of a woman at an abandoned gas station in Houston in 1969.

James Ramsey
Latent Hit of the Year 2011

Facial Services 

The FBI’s Operational Technology Division (OTD) is a driving force behind the FBI’s facial services. The OTD has provided guidance and valuable lead information to support criminal and national security investigations and courtroom testimony to domestic and international investigations for more than 50 years. This forensic service offering began as a side-by-side comparison of crime scene photographic images (typically bank robbery photographs) with known photographs of suspects and subjects for the purpose of associating the persons depicted at a crime scene with a known image. During the ensuing years, FBI experts developed protocols and procedures to assist in these comparisons and also developed lists of physical characteristics to use when attempting to identify a person. Today, the FBI continues to perform video and image analysis of faces in its accredited digital forensic laboratory, one of only a few in the world, for intelligence and criminal investigative purposes and leads the way in pursuit of automated facial biometric capabilities.

 The FBI’s long-term vision is to have an automated, facial recognition capability. Although this capability does not yet exist, the FBI initiated the Next Generation Identification (NGI) Program. NGI will provide an incremental replacement of the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS), the national fingerprint and criminal history record system implemented in 1999. When the NGI system reaches full operating capabilities in 2014, it will provide faster identification processing, increased search capacity, a multimodal framework by incorporating palmprints and face, which will include a facial searching capability, while also expanding the functionality for fingerprint and latent print processing.

Voice Recognition 

The FBI’s voice recognition program has provided investigators with important leads in investigative casework for almost half a century. This program, led by the Operational Technology Division, works to recognize individuals by their voices in order to provide investigative guidance to FBI field offices, as well as other local, state, federal, and international law enforcement agencies. Realizing the potential of voice recognition, the FBI has funded applied research and development projects for more than a decade to achieve its long-term goal of automating voice biometric capabilities.

Policy Forums 

Overviews

The FBI Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE) sponsored a series of interagency facial recognition legal and policy forums. Representatives from law enforcement, national security, and intelligence agencies were invited to participate. Series topics included baselining the current state of facial recognition technology, outlining current and future use requirements and research scenarios, discussing opportunities to collaborate across the federal agency landscape, and assessing how best to develop legal and policy underpinning to support effective deployment of facial recognition technology. The range of legal and policy concerns includes privacy, interoperability, standards development, evidentiary limitations, and data sharing.

Office of the Director of National Intelligence

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 1:
Facial Recognition Technology - Baselining Uses and Legal Challenges

Sponsored by the FBI BCOE in conjunction with the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Forum One invited federal agency lawyers and practitioners to explore and develop a better understanding on how to deploy facial recognition technology in a legally and policy-permissible way. Forum One used speakers and panel discussions by subject matter experts and end users to inform agency lawyers of current and probable future technical capabilities and the situational challenges faced by participating agencies to the effective use of facial recognition technology.

Learn more about Forum 1: Agenda, Presentations, Minutes (pdf)

Department of Homeland Security  

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 2:
Exploring Interagency Information Sharing Challenges and Best Practices

Sponsored by the FBI BCOE in conjunction with the Department of Homeland Security, Forum Two identified Information Sharing as one of the primary areas in need of policy development. This forum presented an opportunity for lively, candid discussion with representatives from a broad range of government organizations. There was a combination of presentations, facilitated discussions, and breakout groups. The purpose of this forum was not to develop policy or authoritative guidance but to stimulate conversation and educate the community about facial recognition technology and the legal/policy issues surrounding its deployment.

Learn more about Forum 2: Agenda, Presentations, Minutes (pdf)

Department of Defense

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 3:
Striking the Balance - A Government Approach to Facial Recognition Privacy and Civil Liberties

Sponsored by the FBI BCOE in conjunction with the Department of Defense, Forum Three examined where the appropriate balance lies between crime and terrorism prevention using facial recognition and robust privacy safeguards. The forum produced privacy protection strategies and best practices. With the goal of separating fact from myth, the forum also produced education strategies to increase understanding by the public about how facial recognition is and is not used by federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies for identification purposes.

Learn more about Forum 3: Agenda, Presentations, Minutes (pdf)

Department of Justice

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 4:
Exploring Public Perceptions of Facial Recognition Technology

Sponsored by the FBI BCOE in conjunction with the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Forum Four examined how facial recognition technology has advanced much more rapidly than the laws and policies that govern it, often resulting in unanswered questions regarding the boundaries of permissibility for facial recognition use. In response, this forum series has facilitated understanding of the capabilities and limitations of facial recognition and law enforcement and intelligence use cases. Through the forums, existing law and policy as it applies to facial recognition technology has been presented, and issues raised by facial recognition so far unaddressed by existing authorities have been identified for future policy development.

Learn more about Forum 4: Agenda, Presentations, Minutes (pdf)

Agendas 

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 1 Agenda 

Last Updated: Monday, July 18, 2011

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

8:30 AM – 8:40 AM 
Welcome 
William M. Casey, Program Manager, Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
Steve Burmeister, Assistant Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Science and Technology, Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)
 
8:40 AM – 8:50 AM 
Forum Preview 
Tony Brown, BRTRC
 
8:50 AM – 9:50 AM 
Facial Recognition: The State of the Art with Q&A 
Dr. Richard W. Vorder Bruegge, Senior Photographic Technologist, FBI
Dr. Jonathan Phillips, Electronics Engineer, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
 
9:50 AM – 10:00 AM 
Break 
 
10:00 AM – 11:30 AM 
Current and Near Future Facial Recognition Applications Panel with Q&A 
B. Scott Swann, Science and Technology Identity Intelligence Lead, ODNI
T. Gregg Motta, Section Chief, Digital Evidence Unit, FBI
Neal Gieselman, Lead Engineer, DoD/BIMA
Steven W. Cooper, Executive Director, LEISI PMO, U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security
Tony Brown facilitating 
11:30 AM - 12:00 PM 
Recap and Charter to Breakout Groups 
 
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM 
Lunch On Your Own 
 
1:00 PM – 2:20 PM 
Breakout Groups 
Tony Brown facilitating 
2:20 PM - 2:30 PM 
Break 
 
2:30 PM -3:30 PM 
Group Reporting and Facilitated Discussion 
Tony Brown facilitating 
3:30 PM – 4:15 PM 
Summary of Proceedings and Introduction to Forum Two 
Tony Brown facilitating 
4:15 PM – 4:30 PM 
Closing Remarks 
William M. Casey, Program Manager, BCOE
 
4:30 PM 
End

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 2 Agenda 

Last Updated: Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

8:30 AM – 8:40 AM 
Welcome 
William M. Casey, Program Manager, Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 

8:40 AM – 8:50 AM 
Forum Preview and Opening 
Tony Brown, Facilitator, BRTRC

8:50 AM – 9:50 AM 
Emerging Technology and the Law 
Professor Laura Donohue, Associate Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

9:50 AM – 10:00 AM 
Blackberry Break 
 
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM 
Biometric Information Sharing Policy Overview 
Monte Hawkins, Director, Identity Management and Biometrics Policy, White House
Janice McGowan, Chief, Information Sharing Program Policy Office, National Counterterrorism Center
 
11:00 AM - 11:45 AM 
Interoperability and Data Sharing 
Charity Harris, Supervisory Management and Program Analyst, Interoperability Initiatives Unit, FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division 
11:45 AM – 12:45 PM 
Lunch On Your Own 
 
12:45 PM – 2:00 PM 
Survey of Agency-Specific Authorities to Share 
John Boyd, Director, Defense Biometrics & Forensics, Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research & Engineering, Department of Defense
Timothy Edgar, Deputy for Civil Liberties, Civil Liberties and Privacy Office, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Edward Fluhr, Policy Section Chief, US-VISIT Program, Department of Homeland Security
Paula Wulff, Assistant General Counsel, Science and Technology Law Unit, FBI
 
2:00 PM - 2:10 PM 
Blackberry Break 
 
2:10 PM -3:30 PM 
Case Studies Examination 
Facilitated by Theodore K. Yoneda, Attorney Advisor, Office of the General Counsel, FBI

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM 
Summary of Proceedings, Call to Action, and Introduction to Forum Three 
Tony Brown facilitating

4:15 PM – 4:30 PM 
Closing Remarks 
William M. Casey, Program Manager, BCOE
 
4:30 PM 
End 
All times approximate 

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 3 Agenda 

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
8:30 AM – 8:45 AM 
Welcome 
William M. Casey, Program Manager, Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
John Boyd, Director, Defense Biometrics & Forensics, Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research & Engineering, Department of Defense (DoD)
 
8:45 AM – 9:00 AM 
Forum Preview and Opening 
Jennifer F. McNally, Management and Program Analyst (MAPA) and Series Strategist, BCOE, FBI
 
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM 
Privacy and Facial Recognition (FR): Legal Landscape 
Peter Swire, C. William O’Neill Professor of Law, Moritz College of Law, Ohio State University
 
10:00 AM – 10:15 AM 
Blackberry Break 
 
10:15 AM – 10:45 AM 
Privacy and FRT: Federal Policy Landscape 
Matthew J. Olsen, Detailee, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB)
Jonathan E. Rackoff, Assistant General Counsel, OMB
 
10:45AM - 12:00 PM 
The Impact of Public Perception on Law and Policy 
Tony Brown, Senior Vice President, BRTRC
Louis E. Grever, former Executive Assistant Director, Science and Technology Branch, FBI
 
12:00 PM - 1:00PM 
Lunch 
 
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM 
Biometrics Privacy Policies by Agency 
Samuel P. Jenkins, Jr., Director for Privacy, Defense Privacy and Civil Liberties Office, DoD
Christopher Lee, Directorate Privacy Officer, Science and Technology Directorate,Department of Homeland Security
Teresa Stasiuk, Privacy Advisor, Civil Liberties Protection Office, Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)
Elizabeth Withnell, Chief, Privacy and Civil Liberties Unit, Office of the General Counsel, FBI
 
2:00 PM – 2:15 PM 
Blackberry Break 
 
2:15 PM - 3:30 PM 
Gaps in FRT Privacy Law and Policy: Exploration of Use Cases 
Theodore K. Yoneda, Attorney Advisor, Office of the General Counsel, FBI
 
3:30 PM -3:40 PM 
Blackberry Break 
 
3:40 PM – 4:15 PM 
Roadmap for FRT Law and Policy Development: Moving Forward 
Jennifer F. McNally, MAPA, BCOE, FBI
 
4:15 PM – 4:30 PM 
Closing Remarks 
William M. Casey, Program Manager, Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
John Boyd, Director, Defense Biometrics & Forensics, Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research & Engineering, Department of Defense (DoD)
 
4:30 PM 
End

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 4 Agenda 

Download Agenda

Monday, June 11, 2012
8:30 AM – 8:45 AM 
Welcome 
William M. Casey, Program Manager, Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
Mark Greene, Biometric Program Manager, National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
 
8:45 AM – 9:15 AM 
Forum Preview and Opening 
Jennifer F. McNally, Management and Program Analyst (MAPA) and Series Strategist, BCOE, FBI
 
9:15 AM – 10:15 AM 
State and Local Law Enforcement Perspective of FR 
Christopher Moore, Chief, San Jose Police Department
 
10:15AM – 10:30 AM 
Break 
 
10:30AM – 11:30 AM 
Judicial Impressions of FR and Recommendations from the Bench 
Frederic N. Smalkin, Chief U.S. District Judge, D.Md. (Ret.), University of Baltimore School of Law
 
11:30 AM - 12:00 PM 
2011 “The National Biometrics Challenge”: A Call for Informed Policy Development 
James Loudermilk, Co-Author and Senior Level Technologist, FBI
 
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM 
Lunch On Your Own 
 
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM 
Public Perceptions of FR: Research Conclusions 
Dr. Lisa S. Nelson, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and Philosophy of Science Department Fellow, University of Pittsburgh
 
2:00 PM - 2:15 PM 
Break 
 
2:15 PM -3:30 PM 
Pulling It All Together: A Formula for Policy Development 
Dr. Lisa S. Nelson 
3:30 PM – 4:00 PM 
Series Summary and Critical Next Steps 
Jennifer F. McNally 
4:00 PM – 4:30 PM 
Closing Remarks 
William M. Casey
William Ford, National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
 
4:30 PM 
End

Organizations Represented 

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 1:

Sponsored by the FBI Biometric Center of Excellence, in conjunction with the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)

  • Biometrics Identity Management Agency (BIMA)
  • BRTRC
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF)
  • Defense Privacy and Civil Liberties Office (DPCLO)
  • Department of Defense (DoD)
  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • Department of State (DoS)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
  • Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)
  • Office of Naval Research (ONR)
  • Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)
  • Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering
  • U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ)
     

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 2:

Sponsored by the FBI Biometric Center of Excellence, in conjunction with the Department of Homeland Security

  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF)
  • Biometrics Identity Management Agency (BIMA)
  • BRTRC
  • Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
  • Department of the Army
  • Department of Commerce
  • Department of Defense (DoD)
  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • Department of Justice (DoJ)
  • Department of State (DoS)
  • Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation - Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation - Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE)
  • Georgetown University Law School
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
  • National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC)
  • Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)
  • Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
  • United States Marshals Service
  • United States Secret Service
  • U.S. Army National Ground Intelligence Center
  • US-VISIT
  • White House, Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 3:

Sponsored by the FBI Biometric Center of Excellence, in conjunction with the Department of Defense

  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF)
  • Biometrics Identity Management Agency (BIMA)
  • BRTRC
  • Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
  • Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA)
  • Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)
  • Department of the Army
  • Department of Defense (DoD)
  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • Department of Justice (DoJ)
  • Department of State (DoS)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation - Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation - Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE)
  • Naval Criminal Investigative Services (NCIS)
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
  • Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)
  • Ohio State University
  • United States Marshals Service
  • United States Secret Service
  • U.S. Army National Ground Intelligence Center
  • US-VISIT
     

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series Forum 4:

Sponsored by the FBI Biometric Center of Excellence, in conjunction with the National Institute of Justice

  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF)
  • Biometrics Identity Management Agency (BIMA)
  • BRTRC
  • Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA)
  • Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)
  • Department of Defense (DoD)
  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • Department of Justice (DoJ)
  • Department of State (DoS)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation - Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation - Biometric Center of Excellence (BCOE)
  • National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC)
  • National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • National Security Agency (NSA)
  • Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS)
  • Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)
  • San Jose Police Department (SJPD)
  • University of Baltimore, School of Law
  • University of Pittsburgh
  • United States Marshals Service (USMS)
  • United States Secret Service (USSS)
  • US-VISIT

Minutes 

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Series

Forum 1: Facial Recognition Technology - Baselining Uses and Legal Challenges

Forum 2: Exploring Interagency Information Sharing Challenges and Best Practices

Forum 3: Striking the Balance - A Government Approach to Facial Recognition Privacy and Civil Liberties

Forum 4: Exploring Public Perceptions of Facial Recognition Technology 

Continuing Legal Education 

U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series participants who wish to submit the overviews/agendas for any or all of the forums in the series to their state bar association and/or employer for consideration to receive continuing legal education hours for attending the series may do so.

Please note, attending the U.S. Government Facial Recognition Legal Series does not guarantee participants will receive continuing legal education hours.

For convenience, the Department of Justice Office (DOJ) of Legal Education website provides reporting instructions to DOJ attorneys.

Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) 

The FBI’s IAFIS is the national fingerprint and criminal history record system that responds to requests 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The IAFIS was implemented in 1999 and is the largest criminal biometric database in the world with over 72 million records. For additional information, please visit the link below:

Next Generation Identification (NGI) Program 

NGI will provide an incremental replacement of the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS), the national fingerprint and criminal history record system which was implemented in 1999. When the NGI system reaches full operating capabilities in 2014, it will provide faster identification processing, increased search capacity, a multimodal framework by incorporating palm prints and face, which will include a facial searching capability, while also expanding the functionality for fingerprint and latent print processing.

Biometric Interoperability Program 

This program promotes biometric-based information sharing between the FBI’s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) and other federal, state, and international biometric systems.

Combined Deoxyribonucleic Acid 
(DNA) Index System (CODIS)

The FBI maintains the largest DNA repository in the world, the National DNA Index System (NDIS), which contains more than 9,812,200 offender profiles, 1,181,300 arrestee profiles, and 441,200 forensic profiles as of July 2012. NDIS facilitates the exchange and comparison of DNA profiles at the national level. It is the highest of three tiers supported by CODIS. CODIS is an automated DNA information processing and telecommunications system which has produced more than 185,000 hits, assisting in more than 177,500 law enforcement investigations as of July 2012. CODIS blends forensic science and computer technology into an effective tool for crime solving. DNA analysis is increasingly used to successfully solve crimes and identify missing persons. For additional information please visit the Laboratory Division’s CODIS webpage. 

Facial Identification Scientific Working Group (FISWG) 

In February 2009, the BCOE established a new scientific working group focusing exclusively on facial identification. The FISWG’s mission is “to develop consensus standards, guidelines, and best practices for the discipline of image-based comparisons of human features, primarily face, as well as to provide recommendations for research and development activities necessary to advance the state of science in this field.” Participants include representatives from federal, state, local, and international agencies, as well as scientists, practitioners, and persons from the research and academic communities. The FISWG also develops resources to educate and inform law enforcement and intelligence communities through workshops and conferences and collaborates with other Scientific Working Groups and bodies, as well as the research and academic communities. For additional information, please visit the following:

Training 

The FBI offers training to authorized agencies, including various biometric training courses. Learn more by visiting the links below: