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June 2024

New agent training in interior corridor in Hogan's Alley at the FBI Training Academy in Quantico, Virginia.
New agent training in new expanded facilities at Hogan's Alley at the Training Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

Message from the Assistant Director, Office of Public Affairs

Hello, FBI Family,

On June 10, Leonard Peltier had his latest parole hearing on hisPublic Affairs Assistant Director Catherine Milhoan two consecutive life sentences for the1975 murders of Special Agents Jack Coler and Ronald Williams. This occasion stirred up painful memories for the entire FBI Family and especially for Jack’s and Ron’s loved ones. The FBI and I are deeply grateful to our alumni for the support you’ve given them over the years and in recent weeks.

Please know that we, too, are taking care of their families. The Bureau has been in constant contact with them, our Victim Services Division had specialists at the hearing to provide support, and EAD Tim Langan represented us in person at the proceedings. Director Wray sent a powerful letter for the hearing record expressing the FBI’s “adamant opposition” to Peltier’s parole request and stating that “the FBI family’s passion and dedication to this issue remains as strong as ever.”

As you know, over the years Peltier and his supporters have spread a lot of inaccurate information about his supposed innocence. To push back, we’ve updated our page about the case on FBI.gov so the public and media can know the clear truth: Peltier murdered two young FBI agents in cold blood; he has never shown remorse; and numerous federal judges have found his claims meritless and agreed his convictions and sentence must stand. As Director Wray noted in his public statement: “Granting parole for Peltier would only serve to diminish the brutality of his crime and further the suffering of the surviving families of agents Coler and Williams, as well as the larger FBI family.”

Thanks again for staying connected, if you have feedback, send us a note at alumni@fbi.gov.

    Cathy Milhoan

By the Numbers: IMD 2023

The Information Management Division (IMD) is a division of more than 1,200 personnel in six geographic locations, with agents, analysts, and professional support staff supporting multiple programs. Its Central Records Complex in Virginia houses over 7 million closed FBI case files.


Files are packaged and recorded and fed onto conveyors at Central Records Complex in Winchester, Virginia. The $135 million complex opened in 2020  to house FBI files.

Central Records Complex


IMD also manages the FBI’s FOIA and Prepublication Programs, releasing over one million pages to the public last year.
Here's a look at some of IMD's accomplishments in 2023:


  • Vetting Requests Processed: 33,900,000+
  • Images and Pages Digitized: 26,800,000+
  • Multimedia Files Digitized: 100,000+
  • Images Scanned & Exported: 24,900,000+
  • FBI Records Ingested: 49,000+
  • Pages & Microfilm Images: 7,800,000+
  • FBI Vault (vault.fbi.gov) Pages Viewed: 6,300,000+
  • Pages Reviewed: 1,300,000+
  • FBI Employees Trained: 11,000+
  • Help Desk Tickets Responded to: 5,700+


Message from the Information Management Division Assistant Director

As the new assistant director of the Information Management Division (IMD), I am excited to connect with former FBI employees to shareShannon Parry, Assistant Director, Information Management Division how IMD is leveraging technology to revolutionize the way the FBI stores, manages, and disseminates information. As Associate Deputy Director Brian Turner highlighted in his April 2024 message, we are committed to instilling and preserving the public’s trust in the integrity of our organization, and management of our information plays a big role. Preserving the work you have done during your service to the Bureau and ensuring the FBI’s information is secure and accessible drives the mission of IMD.

Since we opened the doors to the Central Records Complex in Winchester, Virginia, IMD has taken in more than eight million closed files into a state-of-the-art file storage and retrieval system to clear valuable storage space in the field and at FBI Headquarters; digitized tens of thousands of paper documents to make it easier for agents to manage their investigations; supported government transparency through millions of reviewed pages for Freedom of Information and Privacy Act requests; and partnered with the USG to help vet individuals for various benefits. And that is just the tip of the iceberg.

IMD remains laser focused on upholding the integrity of our information, providing timely public access to information, working with our alumni through the Prepublication Review Office and fulfilling your Privacy Act requests for personnel files, and pursuing innovative possibilities that will benefit the FBI for years to come.

Shannon Parry


News

Want to Write About the FBI? Check With the Prepublication Review Office First

Thinking of writing a book about your time with the FBI? Want to talk about an old case on your friend's podcast? Don't forget to check with the Prepublication Review Office (PRO).

Prepublication review is required for all current and former employees seeking to disclose FBI information outside the FBI in their personal capacity. PRO helps current and former employees to ensure material is free from prohibited disclosures that could harm FBI personnel, assets, and operations. Last fiscal year, PRO handled the following: 

  • 679 total receipts 
  • 71 manuscripts 
  • 376 resumes 
  • 35 interviews/speaking engagements
  • 15,846 pages reviewed
Prepublication Review Office flyer

Download pro-process-former-personnel-accessable.pdf — 166 KB

  • To learn more here about what qualifies for prepublication review, the timeline, and the process, contact PRO at fbiprepub@fbi.gov.


Hopi Special Agent Returns Home to Seek Justice for Tribal Communities

Bureau of Indian Affairs police officer

Before joining the FBI in 2019, Himel served as a Bureau of Indian Affairs police officer.

For Special Agent Piere Himel, investigating Indian Country crime on reservations in New Mexico is more than just a job: it’s a homecoming. As a Native American with deep ties to the land and its traditions, his journey to the FBI is unique. Named after his great-grandfather, a Navy sailor and survivor of the Bataan Death March, Himel comes from a family legacy of service.

"I'm Hopi, and I’m enrolled with the Hopi Tribe," said Himel. "Our reservation is surrounded by the Navajo Reservation, so this job brings me back, closer to home." Details 


Elder Fraud, In Focus

Elder fraud complaints to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (or IC3) increased by 14% in 2023, and associated losses increased by about 11%, according to IC3’s 2023 Elder Fraud Report, released April 30.  

This annual publication provides statistics about incidents of elder fraud—or fraud that explicitly targets older Americans’ money or cryptocurrency—that are reported to IC3. The report aims to raise the public’s awareness of this issue and to prevent future and repeat incidents. Details

Full Report: IC3 2023 Elder Fraud Report

Stock image depicting a senior citizen on the phone and holding a credit card.


Laura's Park

Park in Pueblo, Colorado dedicated to agent killed in line of duty in 2021

Laura Schwartzenberger's husband and children at Laura's Park in Pueblo, Colorado, which commemorates Laura Schwartzenberger and her partner, Special Agent Daniel Alfin, who were shot and killed in the line of duty on February 2, 2021, while serving a search warrant at a suspect’s home in Sunrise, Florida, as part of a violent crimes against children investigation.

Laura Schwartzenberger's husband, Jason Baca, and sons attended the dedication of Laura's Park in Pueblo, Colorado, where she grew up.

It was a beautiful Saturday during Memorial Day weekend at Laura’s Park in Pueblo, Colorado. It was breezy, but the sun was warm. Colorado was still in the midst of spring, not yet summer.

Fallen FBI Special Agent Laura Schwartzenberger grew up in Pueblo. She played in what used to be called Starlite Park, and she met her husband, Jason Baca, in their shared hometown.

Her FBI career took her to Albuquerque and then Miami. But Pueblo was home, and many of her friends and family still live in the area.


So it was fitting that Pueblo renamed the little playground near her childhood home “Laura’s Park.” Jason’s aunt, Janice Madrid, spearheaded a fundraising campaign to install new equipment and make the park more accessible. The Pueblo City Council issued a proclamation designating May 25, 2024, “Laura Schwartzenberger Day.”

When the day arrived, park neighbors joined Laura’s and Jason’s friends and family at the park. Laura’s FBI family came in force from FBI Denver, the Society of Former Special Agents and the FBI Denver Citizens Academy Alumni Association. Laura’s sister, Beth Schwartzenberger, drove from metro Denver. Most important, Jason flew in from Florida with their sons, Gavin and Damon.

Before the noon ceremony, the park was filled with cheerful exclamations as attendees greeted each other. An aunt didn’t recognize a cousin who now has short hair. Retired agents found their former colleagues. Current FBI employees were glad to reconnect with friends who had left the Bureau.

The park filled with lawn chairs, dogs on leashes and strollers. The city set up a podium with flowers the FBI Agents Association donated. There was a tent with chairs, a microphone and a speaker.

"It is a fitting tribute to an FBI agent who had a passion for helping children, and who knew what it meant to treasure time with family."


Mark Michalek, special agent in charge, FBI Denver
A Plaque at Laura's Park in Pueblo, Colorado. Laura Schwartzenberger and her partner, Special Agent Daniel Alfin, were shot and killed in the line of duty on February 2, 2021, while serving a search warrant at a suspect’s home in Sunrise, Florida, as part of a violent crimes against children investigation.

A sign in Laura’s Park commemorates the Pueblo native in words suggested by her husband.

Releasing doves at Laura's Park in Pueblo, Colorado, which commemorates Laura Schwartzenberger and her partner, Special Agent Daniel Alfin, who were shot and killed in the line of duty on February 2, 2021, while serving a search warrant at a suspect’s home in Sunrise, Florida, as part of a violent crimes against children investigation.

The family of Jason and Laura released doves at the end of the ceremony.

The ceremony began at noon with a joint honor guard from the Pueblo Police Department and Pueblo County Sheriff’s Office, and a woman sang the national anthem. The city council president read the proclamation. The Pueblo police chief spoke, and a priest gave a blessing.

When it was time for Denver SAC Mark Michalek, he spoke of Laura’s life and accomplishments, her faith and her career. But the highlight was her commitment to family.

“To the family Laura left behind, know that you will always be part of our greater FBI family. You’ve got 38,000 FBI employees in all 50 states and in 60 countries around the world, and an even larger law enfo rcement extended family, standing by to help and support you whenever you need it."

 

From left, Miles Gooderham, president Rocky Mountain chapter SOFSA; Janice Madrid; Jason Baca; Gavin and Damon; SAC Mark Michalek; Beth Schwartzenberger.

From left: Miles Gooderham, president Rocky Mountain chapter SOFSA; Janice Madrid; Jason Baca; Gavin and Damon; SAC Mark Michalek; Beth Schwartzenberger.


“And to Laura and Jason’s extended family here in Pueblo, thank you for working with the city on this neighborhood park. It is a fitting tribute to an FBI agent who had a passion for helping children, and who knew what it meant to treasure time with family.”

Laura’s husband, Jason, spoke last. He walked to the podium flanked by his two sons. As he described how being a mother meant the world to his wife, he had to pause. The crowd was silent, giving him time. The applause was loud when he finished.

The playground at Laura's Park in Pueblo, Colorado, which commemorates Laura Schwartzenberger and her partner, Special Agent Daniel Alfin, who were shot and killed in the line of duty on February 2, 2021, while serving a search warrant at a suspect’s home in Sunrise, Florida, as part of a violent crimes against children investigation.

The revamped park boasts new playground equipment and sidewalks accessible for people of varying abilities.

Then Laura’s and Jason’s family members gathered in a circle to release white doves as music played. The birds soared into the blue sky.

And the children in Laura’s Park ran off to eat hot dogs, paint rocks, color the sidewalk with chalk and scramble on the new playground equipment.

It was a fitting end to a perfect day for families at Laura’s Park.

Laura Schwartzenberger and her partner, Special Agent Daniel Alfin, were shot and killed in the line of duty on February 2, 2021, while serving a search warrant at a suspect’s home in Sunrise, Florida, as part of a Violent Crimes Against Children investigation.

 


FBI Leaders Express Opposition to Parole Request of Leonard Peltier, Who Killed Two Special Agents in 1975

Letter by Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI

Below is a May 13, 2024, letter from Michael J. Clark, president of the Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI, to Patricia K. Cushwa, acting chairman of the United States Parole Commission.

Dear Chairman Cushwa:

This letter expresses the staunch opposition from the members of the Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI to Leonard Peltier’s latest request for parole. The Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI is a non-profit membership organization of current and former Special Agents of the FBI. The Society consists of approximately 8,500 members and has been in existence for more than 80 years.

We understand that Mr. Peltier is seeking parole and that a support group continues to actively advocate for his release from federal prison. We wholeheartedly believe his request for parole should be denied for numerous compelling reasons. Peltier was lawfully convicted of the murders of FBI Agents Coler and Williams in federal court. The Court imposed consecutive life sentences. Since then, over a dozen appeals have been considered. None have altered Peltier’s conviction and sentencing.

On June 26, 1975, FBI Agents Jack Coler and Ronald Williams were engaged in a fugitive search on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. American Indian Movement members, including Peltier, caught Agents Coler and Williams in a crossfire while they walked through an open field. Peltier approached the critically wounded Agents and executed them at point-blank range. This was an outrageous act of premeditated murder of two federal law enforcement agents.

Over the years, Peltier has made many outrageous and self-incriminating public statements that strongly reinforce his unrepentant and remorseless guilt. Such declarations include: “And really, if necessary, I’d do it all over again because it was the right thing to do” (2010); and “I don’t regret any of this for a minute” (2014). Further, Peltier has been involved in new criminal conduct while serving his sentence. In 1979, he engaged in an armed escape from Lompoc Penitentiary, during which he assaulted a correctional officer with intent to cause bodily harm and then committed an armed robbery on escape status. For this post-conviction violent criminal act, Peltier received an additional seven-year consecutive sentence. Peltier has also violated prison rules during his incarceration with eight non-drug related infractions and four drug-related infractions.

The families, friends, and professional associates of Agents Coler and Williams continue to suffer from the loss of two fine young men who were senselessly and brutally murdered in the line of duty. Peltier made a conscious decision to execute the two seriously wounded agents. There is no clemency or parole for them or their families. In the current environment of violence against law enforcement officers, parole for this cold-blooded murderer will send the wrong message for potential future acts of violence.

Parole should be reserved for non-violent offenders who have proven they have been rehabilitated and have observed the rules of the institution. In stark contrast, Peltier is a vicious repeat felon whose statements do not support any credible level of remorse for his crimes of extreme violence. His remarks are indicative of a continued lack of regret for his murderous acts on that infamous day. Peltier is once again seeking consideration and mercy but showed no compassion to Agents Coler and Williams. Peltier deserves no compassion in return for the executions he intentionally chose to commit.

As John Adams once stated, “Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.” Despite his best efforts, Peltier cannot escape these facts. In 1975, Peltier and others wounded Special Agents Coler and Williams in a barrage of gunfire. Peltier then approached the wounded agents and executed them at close range. In the decades since Peltier committed his heinous crimes, his convictions and sentence have been upheld and his manufactured arguments rejected by court after court.

This is not a situation of wrongful conviction or sentencing. Leonard Peltier has been afforded his rights and due process. Repeatedly, the weight of the evidence has supported his conviction and his life sentence. We respectfully urge you to reject Mr. Peltier’s request for parole and recommend to the United States Parole Commission that his application be denied. Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Sincerely yours,

Michael J. Clark, President
Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI


Beware 'Free' Verification on Online Dating Sites

The FBI warns of "free" online verification service schemes in which fraudsters target users of dating websites and applications (apps) to defraud victims into signing up for recurring payments.

Unlike romance scams involving investment-confidence schemes, commonly referred to as pig-butchering, where victims are convinced to transfer large amounts of money over time, the so called "free" verification schemes involve recurring and costly monthly subscription fees.

Details

Swatting and Elections

Federal agencies have issued guidance for election workers and law enforcement that includes ways to mitigate risks, such as establishing relationships and protocols in advance. Learn more (PDF)

Attorney General Merrick Garland's statement on botnet dismantlement and arrest.

Botnet Dismantled; FBI Provides Way to ID and Remove VPN Applications

A court-authorized international law enforcement operation led by the U.S. Justice Department disrupted a botnet used to commit cyber attacks, large-scale fraud, child exploitation, harassment, bomb threats, and export violations. Details

How to Identify and Remove VPN Applications That Contain 911 S5 Back Doors


Behind the Mic

Person Placing Ballot into Ballot Box (Stock Image)

FBI Director Condemns Threats to Election Workers

Director Christopher Wray underscored the Bureau’s dedication to protecting election workers from harm during a May 13 meeting of the Department of Justice’s Election Threats Task Force in Washington, D.C. 

“Let me be clear: Any threat of violence to an election official, volunteer, or staff is completely unacceptable and something the FBI takes very seriously,” Director Wray said. “And we’re committed to ensuring threats to election workers receive the swift and thorough response they deserve, whether that’s through federal investigation and prosecution or a referral to our state and local partners.”  

The Justice Department established the Election Threats Task Force in June 2021 to combat threats against election workers. Members include the FBI, various DOJ components, and other federal agency partners. Details

Resources:


On this episode of Inside the FBI—and in honor of Police Week 2024—we'll learn how the FBI Police support the FBI mission, how they’re trained, what it takes to join their ranks, and what this week’s observance means to them. Details

The FBI Police Color Guard during Police Week 2023 observance in Washington, D.C.

Supervisory Special Agent Marilyn Santos and Special Agent Kevin VA!zquez, both of FBI San Juan, pose for a photo with their badges in front of the American flag and the FBI flag.In Case You Missed It

Special Agent Kevin Vázquez has been part of the FBI extended family since his mom, Supervisory Special Agent Marilyn Santos, joined the Bureau when he was a kid. Their interconnected journeys highlight a shared dedication, sacrifice, and commitment to justice.

Santos started her career with the IRS before joining the FBI as a special agent in 2006. Her path to law enforcement was born out of a conviction to make an impact.

“I had two main goals: to serve my country and provide for my children,” said Santos. “The Bureau offered me a way to do both.”

Details

This series features stories, images, and videos produced by the team that manages fbi.gov.

Features

'I Survived; Hitler Didn't'

Holocaust survivor shares experience with Los Angeles Field Office

Holocaust Survivor Joe Alexander Shows Tattoo

Joe Alexander endured imprisonment in 12 concentration camps in Poland and Germany during World War II.

Employees at FBI Los Angeles and throughout the Bureau learned living history from Holocaust survivor Joe Alexander. Joe is 101 years old and survived being in 12 concentration camps in Poland and Germany during World War II.

He spoke eloquently and with a clear, even pace as the crowd in Los Angeles listened intently, some fighting back tears during his April 17 visit, which was also webcast via FBITV. 

Joe described the horrific details of being inside the Warsaw Ghetto in his youth and shared the moment when he saw the members of his family for the very last time. He endured imprisonment in 12 concentration camps, from Dachau to Auschwitz to Birkenau among others. 

He spoke about being roused by the guards only to watch three victims be hanged, presumably for not being strong or fast enough to carry out their forced labor. 

For more than 30 minutes, Joe told his story without interruption. He talked about how he and his family lived a “very good life” until 1939 when the Nazis invaded and split Poland into two; half for the Third Reich and half was still Poland but under German occupation. The Alexander family lived in the area the Third Reich controlled. The Nazis took his uncle away from the town square where the Alexander family lived until Joe was 16 years old.

Special Agent Corey McFadden is pictured with Joe Alexander, who rolled up his sleeve to reveal his assigned concentration camp serial number tattooed on his left arm.

Special Agent Corey McFadden is pictured with Joe Alexander, who rolled up his sleeve to reveal his assigned concentration camp serial number tattooed on his left arm.


Eventually, Joe and many other Jews were forced to live in the Warsaw Ghetto, a walled-off and cramped area with over 400,000 people living in squalor, where it was common to see dead bodies strewn along the street. After five months in the ghetto, his parents learned their hometown of Kowal was safe and bribed guards so that Joe, a sister and a brother could return there. Several days later, all Jewish men from ages 16 to 60 were told to report to a schoolhouse.

Joe soon found himself at the first concentration camp where he and his fellow Jews were forced to do hard labor under extremely poor conditions and with barely any food. He built dams, laid cobblestones, built roofs and an airport and laid railroad tracks, among other menial tasks. During these trials, he became very ill on more than one occasion and noted matter-of-factly that during this time, “people died every day.” 

Joe had worked in seven camps by the time he was put on a train with Jews packed into cars for days with “no food, no water and no facilities.” When the train stopped at the infamous town of Auschwitz, 30% to 40% of its passengers were already dead, he recalled.

Passengers were lined up in rows of five and were met by Dr. Mengele, known notoriously as the “Doctor of Death.” It was dark, and Mengele selected some Jewish prisoners to perform human experiments on; the old, the sick and children were placed in a second line, and Joe was among them because “he was a little guy.”

But because Joe had been in multiple camps before Auschwitz, he knew to stick with the big, strong men. As Mengele walked away from him, Joe switched lines in the darkness.

Otherwise, he said, “I would not be talking to you today.”

Shortly after arriving at Auschwitz, Joe received a tattoo on his left arm; he paused and rolled up his sleeve and recited his number, “1-4-2-5-8-4.” From that moment on, he was never again called by his name.

"I never lost faith, never stopped believing in God. I may have a bad day today, but tomorrow will be a better day."


Joe Alexander, Holocaust survivor
The FBI’s Jewish American Employee Resource Group presented Joe Alexander with a custom-made FBI yarmulke.

The FBI’s Jewish American employee resource group presented Joe Alexander with a custom-made FBI yarmulke.

In response to an employee’s question, Joe said that it never occurred to him to have the tattoo removed because it’s a daily reminder of what he endured and what happened to his family. The tattoo helps him tell his story so that he can speak for “the 6 million who cannot talk.”   

He walked to another camp — Birkenau — where he was imprisoned for six months and saw Mengele two more times at a distance. In Birkenau, Joe saw men being beaten to death or who ran into electric fences because they “couldn’t take it anymore,” he said. 

After the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising in April 1943, Joe returned to the area to help clean it up and stack bricks 8- to 10-feet high. There were no facilities or sanitation, and typhus broke out in the ghetto.

He never knew anyone who went to the hospital and came out alive, so he crouched behind the bricks for several days with a high fever when an indifferent Nazi was in charge and recovered. He later found himself marching, then on a train to the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. Joe saw female prisoners for the first time at Dachau. He worked in a kitchen that cooked for German guards outside Dachau and smuggled food for his fellow prisoners.  

In late April 1945, while in Dachau, Joe and his fellow prisoners were told they were going on a “death march” into the mountains. They walked for days but could hear fighting in the distance and sensed that American troops weren’t far behind. While in the forest, Joe ate some cooked horsemeat and said it was the best meal he’d had in years.

The next day, Joe and his fellow prisoners were brought to a nearby town and were finally liberated by American troops. He and others were directed to an underground bunker, a large warehouse, and were given food, clothing and bicycles, and then stayed temporarily in a displaced persons (DP) camp. Soon he found himself in Munich and knew he was free. 

Joe Alexander’s appearance attracted media interest.

Joe Alexander’s appearance attracted media interest.


For months, Joe went from DP camp to DP camp to look for family members — his parents, two sisters and a brother — whom he hadn’t seen since the Warsaw Ghetto. “To this day, I don’t know what happened to them,” he told the somber crowd.

Joe reunited with a cousin in Poland and later lived in Germany where he stayed because he didn’t have a passport. Ultimately, he was sponsored by a Jewish organization and registered in Munich to go to America. Joe was examined by a doctor and, while it was unclear if he was joking, he said he also had to “get checked out by the FBI.” That comment elicited a chuckle from the audience.

Joe arrived by boat to New York on May 30, 1949, and was sent by his sponsor to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He worked for a tailor whom he described affectionately, saying wistfully, “a father couldn’t be better than he was to me.”  Joe stayed for six months and moved in 1950 to Santa Monica, California, where his cousin had relocated. 

During the Korean War, Joe worked as a tailor in Victorville, California, and stayed for seven years near a military installation. Later, he moved back to Los Angeles and opened his own store on Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles Uniform Exchange. His store, where he sold military uniforms to television and movie studios, was just down the street from Paramount Studios. Joe married and had two children. He ran the store for 37 years before he retired. 

Reflecting on his ordeal, Joe said that he was determined to survive. “I never lost faith, never stopped believing in God. I may have a bad day today, but tomorrow will be a better day.” 

When asked if he would recommend a movie about the Holocaust, Joe said his favorite depiction is “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.” He also recommended the book, “Night,” written by fellow survivor Elie Weisel, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. 

Via FBITV, an employee commented that Joe was blessed with an uncanny ability to assess his situation and decide on multiple occasions the appropriate actions needed to save his life, adding, “I wish the world had your spirit and determination.” 

Joe talked about how present-day antisemitism pains him and compared some of the current tensions to how the Holocaust started in November 1938 when Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, took the lives of dozens of Jews. Thirty thousand Jews were arrested, and hundreds of synagogues were destroyed.

Joe said it’s our job to educate the young people, many of whom have not learned about the Holocaust. When asked to give advice to today’s youth, he advised that they should treat others how they would want to be treated. 

When an employee asked Joe to share his secret to longevity, he laughed and said that’s what everyone asks him. Turning serious, he said, “There is no secret, just keep busy. I’m busy almost every day.”

Acting ADIC Mehtab Syed presented Joe with a certificate from Director Wray, which thanked him for his service to the public. Syed told Joe that she had visited Dachau and poignantly hugged him. A Los Angeles representative for BuJews, the FBI’s Jewish American Employee Resource Group, presented Joe with a custom-made FBI yarmulke and an inaugural BuJews coin engraved with “Justice Justice, You Shall Pursue,” in Hebrew, a passage from the Book of Deuteronomy, which is part of the Torah and the Old Testament.

At the end of the presentation, Joe was asked if he had ever returned to the concentration camps later in life. He returned to Auschwitz and Dachau and noted that a bunk where he was incarcerated is still there.

Why did he return? Joe simply said, “I came back because I survived. Hitler didn’t.” 


"There is no secret. Just keep busy. I’m busy almost every day."


Joe Alexander, describing how he has lived to be 101 years old

Building Authentic Relationships With Those We Serve

FBI Assistant Director Robert J. Contee III (third from right) speaks as part of a panel discussion on the importance of law enforcement's engagement with diverse communities at the Professionalizing Law Enforcement Community Engagement Training (PLECET) in Atlanta in May.

FBI Assistant Director Robert J. Contee III (third from right) speaks as part of a panel discussion on the importance of law enforcement's engagement with diverse communities at the Professionalizing Law Enforcement Community Engagement Training (PLECET) in Atlanta in May.

In early May, the FBI joined with the MovementForward non-profit organization to help train law enforcement officers and community leaders on developing effective outreach programs. The Professionalizing Law Enforcement Community Engagement Training (PLECET) Conference, sponsored by MovementForward in Atlanta, brought together 1,700 outreach professionals to share best practices, look at innovations in the field, and build support networks across the country.

Robert Contee, assistant director of the FBI’s Office of Partner Engagement, served as one of several panelists during a keynote discussion on how law enforcement agencies can better connect with people of all backgrounds.


“Optimal community safety is achieved through collaborative efforts, where local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies work alongside community members, jointly striving towards the common goal of fostering safer communities,” said AD Contee.

In addition, the FBI’s outreach professionals led a workshop on building connections with vulnerable communities through accountability, acknowledgment, and authenticity. “For quite some time, many agencies–including the FBI–have focused their outreach program efforts in traditional ways such as with academies and feel good events,” said Ken Hoffman, unit chief of the FBI’s community relations program. “There will always be a role for those programs, but we are working to flip the focus to emphasize the importance of relationships first. This conference was an opportunity to share our work with a large audience.”

FBI Assistant Director Robert J. Contee III (right) joins with FBI Community Outreach Specialist Demetrius Smith at the Professionalizing Law Enforcement Community Engagement Training (PLECET) in Atlanta in May.

FBI Assistant Director Robert J. Contee III (right) joins with FBI Community Outreach Specialist Demetrius Smith at the Professionalizing Law Enforcement Community Engagement Training (PLECET) in Atlanta in May.

Both at FBIHQ and with our community outreach specialists in the FBI’s 56 field offices, we are emphasizing the need to take accountability for both the Bureau’s history and how our experiences shape our personal perceptions. We also must acknowledge the hard work ahead as we build trust with communities that carry trauma or are distrustful of government and law enforcement. Finally, we strive to act each day with authenticity in word and action. Only with authenticity can we all develop empathy for each other with the intent of healing the difficulties that divide us.

If you would like to learn more about the FBI’s community outreach program, please visit our webpage at www.fbi.gov/outreach.

"We are working to flip the focus to emphasize the importance of relationships first."


Ken Hoffman, unit chief, FBI Community Relations Unit

History

The RESMURS (Reservation Murders) Case

On June 26, 1975, Special Agents Jack Coler and Ronald Williams were murdered at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in the southwest corner of South Dakota. An examination of the physical evidence concluded that Williams and Coler had been killed at close range by a .223 type bullet. According to witnesses, Leonard Peltier, a wanted fugitive at the time, was identified as the only person in possession of a weapon that would fire a .223 type bullet at the time of the murders. Details

Special Agent Jack R. Coler, slain at Pine Ridge, South Dakota, while trying to serve arrest warrants on the Oglala Sioux Indian Reservation on June 26, 1975.

Special Agent Jack Coler

Agent Williams’s car after the attack by Leonard Peltier at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Agent Williams and his partner, Special Agent Jack Coler, were murdered by Peltier on June 26, 1975.
Special Agent Ronald A. Williams, slain on June 26, 1975 while attempting to serve arrest warrants for robbery and assault with a dangerous weapon on the Oglala Sioux Indian Reservation in Pine Ridge, South Dakota. Leonard Peltier was convicted and received two consecutive life sentences.

Special Agent Ronald Williams

Agent Williams’s car after the attack by Leonard Peltier at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Agent Williams and his partner, Special Agent Jack Coler, were murdered by Peltier on June 26, 1975.
Agent Coler’s car after the attack by Leonard Peltier at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Agent Coler and his partner, Special Agent Ronald Williams, were murdered by Peltier on June 26, 1975.
The agents’ vehicles contained a total of 125 bullet holes. This total does not include the rounds that hit the agents, the windows, or were misses. 

National Missing Children's Day

Help Us Find Them

Every year on National Missing Children’s Day, May 25, we reaffirm our commitment to investigating these cases and finding children who have been reported kidnapped or missing, and we continue to encourage parents, caregivers, and others to make child safety a priority.

Please take a look at the faces of the children on this page. If you have any information about these children that could help lead to their recovery, please consider contacting the FBI, local law enforcement, or submitting a tip online.

The FBI's Child ID app—the first mobile application created by the FBI—provides a convenient place to electronically store photos and other vital information about your children so that it’s literally right at hand if you need it.


Be Careful at the ATM

Skimming occurs when devices illegally installed on ATMs, point-of-sale (POS) terminals, or fuel pumps capture data or record cardholders’ PINs. Criminals use the data to create fake debit or credit cards and then steal from victims’ accounts. It is estimated that skimming costs financial institutions and consumers more than $1 billion each year. Learn more

Tips:

  • Inspect ATMs, POS terminals, and other card readers before using. Look for anything loose, crooked, damaged, or scratched. Don't use any card reader if you notice anything unusual.
  • Pull at the edges of the keypad before entering your PIN. Then, cover the keypad when you enter your PIN to prevent cameras from recording your entry.
  • Use ATMs in a well-lit, indoor location, which are less vulnerable targets.
  • Be alert for skimming devices in tourist areas, which are popular targets.
  • Use debit and credit cards with chip technology. In the U.S., there are fewer devices that steal chip data versus magnetic strip data.
  • Avoid using your debit card when you have linked accounts. Use a credit card instead.
  • Contact your financial institution if the ATM doesn't return your card after you end or cancel a transaction.



Stay in the Loop

You can follow @FBI on X (formerly Twitter), Facebook, and Instagram to stay up to date on the Bureau's latest news and stories. 

Post on Social Media Site X showing two small clocks form 2010 Times Square bombing attempt.

The FBI Alumni E-Brief is distributed through our alumni and family organizations. These groups share it through their membership lists, we do not maintain an individual email list. Currently, the groups receiving the AEB are:

  • The Society of FBI Alumni 
  • Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI
  • FBI Agents Association
  • FBI National Citizens Academy Alumni Association
  • FBI National Academy Associates
  • FBI National Executive Institute Associates
  • FBI LEEDA
  • InfraGard
  • Not a member of one of these organizations? The AEB is on Facebook: FBI-Federal Bureau of Investigation Family (Current/Retired) 

If you are aware of another group to assist in sharing this AEB with the FBI family, please let us know. You can also send content suggestions, photo or story submissions, as well as critiques to alumni@fbi.gov