U.S. Attorney's Office
District of Idaho
(208) 334-1211
February 3, 2015

Investment Adviser Sentenced

COEUR D’ALENE—JoAnn Jackson, 63, of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, was sentenced today to 30 months in prison for wire fraud, U.S. Attorney Wendy J. Olson announced. U.S. District Judge Edward J. Lodge also ordered Jackson to serve three years of supervised release, to pay $811,084.32 in restitution and to serve 200 hours of community service. Jackson pleaded guilty on November 20, 2014.

According to the plea agreement, Jackson admitted that in 1994, she became a licensed stock broker in Idaho. Early in her career, Jackson came into contact with a victim, who eventually put all of her investment accounts under Jackson’s care. Jackson developed a scheme to misappropriate the victim’s money by transferring the funds from the victim’s account into other accounts, eventually obtaining the benefit of the money stolen. Jackson was remanded into federal custody immediately following the sentencing.

The case was investigated by Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

Today’s announcement is part of efforts underway by President Obama’s Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force (FFETF), which was created in November 2009 to wage an aggressive, coordinated and proactive effort to investigate and prosecute financial crimes. With more than 20 federal agencies, 94 U.S. attorneys’ offices and state and local partners, it’s the broadest coalition of law enforcement, investigatory and regulatory agencies ever assembled to combat fraud. Since its formation, the task force has made great strides in facilitating increased investigation and prosecution of financial crimes; enhancing coordination and cooperation among federal, state and local authorities; addressing discrimination in the lending and financial markets and conducting outreach to the public, victims, financial institutions and other organizations. Over the past three fiscal years, the Justice Department has filed more than 10,000 financial fraud cases against nearly 15,000 defendants including more than 2,700 mortgage fraud defendants. For more information on the task force, visit www.stopfraud.gov.

This content has been reproduced from its original source.