U.S. Attorney's Office
District of Idaho
(208) 334-1211
October 16, 2014

Bonners Ferry Men Arraigned on Indictment for Violent ATM Theft in McCall and ATM Thefts in Boise, Meridian, Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming

BOISE—Nathan Paul Davenport, 34, and Matthew Taber Annable, 39, both formerly of Bonners Ferry, Idaho, were arraigned today in Boise by United States Magistrate Judge Mikel H. Williams on an indictment charging multiple bank larcenies, conspiracy, and use of a deadly weapon during a felony offense, U.S. Attorney Wendy J. Olson announced. Trial is set for December 16, 2014, in front of U.S. Chief District Judge B. Lynn Winmill.

Davenport and Annable were arrested without incident on January 12, 2014, in Orem, Utah, in connection with a separate ATM robbery in Wyoming. The two men have been in custody on Wyoming charges, prior to being transported to Boise. In the District of Wyoming, both men pleaded guilty to single counts of ATM Theft and Aiding and Abetting and each received a fourteen month prison sentence.

The charge of bank larceny by use of a dangerous weapon as charged in the Idaho indictment is punishable by up to 25 years in prison, a maximum fine of $250,000, and up to five years of supervised release. The charge of use of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony offense is punishable by a mandatory minimum of ten years up to life imprisonment, a maximum fine of $250,000, and up to five years’ supervised release. The charge of bank larceny is punishable by up to ten years in prison, a maximum fine of $250,000, and up to three years of supervised release. The charge of conspiracy to commit bank larceny is punishable by up to five years in prison, a maximum fine of $250,000, and up to three years of supervised release.

The case is being investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Idaho State Police, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office, and the McCall Police Department.

Indictments and complaints are a means of charging a person with criminal activity. They are not evidence. The person is presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

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