FBI Phoenix
Jill McCabe
(623) 466-1844
June 26, 2020

FBI Phoenix Issues First ‘Seeking Information’ Poster in Navajo Language

PHOENIX—The FBI Phoenix Field Office issued its first seeking information poster in the Navajo language, on a homicide on the Navajo Nation in Arizona.

The poster advertises a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of individual or individuals responsible for the 2013 homicide of Caldwell Dewyne Smith.

“The FBI is dedicated to protecting all of our communities,” said Sean Kaul, special agent in charge of the FBI Phoenix Field Office. “Our agents, analysts and professional staff who work Indian Country are passionate about the tribal communities they serve. We know our success relies upon the collaboration of our partner agencies and the community providing invaluable tips. We want to ensure that we are not only connecting with the communities we serve, but that we are getting any and all information that can solve these crimes and bring the perpetrators to justice.”

The Navajo language poster was made possible by FBI Navajo-speaking employees in coordination with FBI Headquarters and the Phoenix FBI Division.

Smith’s body was found on September 15, 2013, in Shonto, Arizona, on the Navajo Nation Indian Reservation. The medical examiner ruled his death to be a homicide.

The FBI is working with the Navajo Nation Division of Public Safety on this case.

Anyone with information on this homicide is asked to call the FBI in Phoenix at (623) 466-1999. Tips can also be submitted at tips.fbi.gov.

FBI Phoenix first announced the reward in an English version of the poster which was released on March 6, 2020.

The FBI poster in English and Navajo can be found here: https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/seeking-info/caldwell-dewyne-smith

This is the fourth poster release by the FBI, which has been translated into Navajo; FBI Albuquerque released three others, the first was in March 2020.

Read more about the FBI’s work in Indian Country here: https://www.fbi.gov/investigate/violent-crime/indian-country-crime