U.S. Attorney's Office
District of New Jersey
(973) 645-2888
October 30, 2014

Atlantic County Man Pleads Guilty to Conspiring to Defraud the Internal Revenue Service of Nearly $120,000 in Taxes

CAMDEN, NJ—An Atlantic County, New Jersey, man today admitted conspiring to defraud the IRS of $119,880 in income taxes over approximately three years, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman announced today.

William Boland, 57, of Ventnor City, New Jersey, pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Joseph H. Rodriguez in Camden federal court to an information charging him with one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States.

According to documents filed in the case and statements made in court:

Boland and two conspirators were partners in Royal Rolling Chairs Inc., a business based in Atlantic City, New Jersey, that provided rolling chair transportation services to patrons on the Atlantic City boardwalk. Boland and his two partners were responsible for accurately reporting income received by the business to the IRS.

Boland admitted that he and his two partners hid gross cash receipts from the operation of the business and did not report this revenue to the IRS. He admitted the business maintained a second set of books, which tracked the unreported cash revenue taken out of the business. The total tax loss from the conspiracy was $119,800.

The count of conspiracy to defraud the United States carries a maximum potential penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, or twice the gain or loss from the offense. Sentencing is currently scheduled for May 4, 2015.

U.S. Attorney Fishman credited special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation, under the direction of Acting Special Agent in Charge Jonathan D. Larsen, and special agents of the FBI, under the direction of Special Agent in Charge Aaron T. Ford in Newark, with the investigation leading to today’s guilty plea.

The government is represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Matthew J. Skahill of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Special Prosecutions Division in Camden and Trial Attorney Tino Lisella of the Tax Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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