U.S. Attorney's Office
Southern District of Indiana
(317) 226-6333
July 15, 2015

Army Soldier Indicted for Criminal Sexual Activity with a Minor

EVANSVILLE—United States Attorney Josh J. Minkler announced today federal charges against Guangyu Ai, 32, of Arcadia, California. Ai, a Soldier in the United States Army, was previously stationed at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Ai was indicted on one count of transportation of a minor with intent to engage in criminal sexual activity and four counts of travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual conduct.

“Protecting our children from sexual predators is a top priority of my office,” said Minkler. “Anyone who crosses state lines to engage in illegal sexual activity with a minor, should plan to spend many years in federal prison.”

According to the criminal complaint, Ai met the minor through a social media application and continued to communicate with her via text messages. After continued text messaging, the two met and knowing that the minor girl was only 13 years old, Ai pursued a sexual relationship with her. Ai travelled from Fort Campbell, Kentucky to the minor’s residence in Southern Indiana multiple times intending to have a sexual relationship. It is alleged that on one occasion, Ai picked up the minor and took her to a hotel in Kentucky.

Ai had his initial appearance in federal court in Evansville today and was detained. His trial scheduled for September 15, 2015.

This investigation was a collaborative effort between the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Spencer County Sheriff’s Department, Air Force Office of Special Investigations, and the United States Army Criminal Investigation Command.

According to Assistant United States Attorney Kyle Sawa, who is prosecuting this case for the government, Ai faces not less than 10 years and up to life for the count involving transportation of a minor with intent to engage in criminal sexual activity, if convicted. In addition, Ai faces up to 30 years for each count for traveling with intent to engage in illicit sexual conduct, if convicted.

An indictment is only a charge and is not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government must prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

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