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April 21, 2015

Operator of Detroit Adult Day Care Center and Two Home Health Care Company Owners Sentenced in $29 Million Medicare Fraud Conspiracy

The former operator of a Detroit adult day care center and two former owners of Detroit-area home health care companies were sentenced to prison today for their roles in a $29 million Medicare fraud scheme.

Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Barbara L. McQuade of the Eastern District of Michigan, Special Agent in Charge Paul M. Abbate of the FBI’s Detroit Field Office, Special Agent in Charge Lamont Pugh III of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG) Chicago Regional Office and Special Agent in Charge Jarod Koopman of Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI) made the announcement.

Felicar Williams, 51, of Dearborn, Michigan, was sentenced to five years in prison and ordered to pay $2,431,018 in restitution, representing the amount paid by Medicare for Williams’ fraudulent claims. Abdul Malik Al-Jumail, 54, and Jamella Al-Jumail, 25, both of Brownstown, Michigan, were sentenced to 10 years in prison and four years in prison respectively. Both were also ordered to pay $8,389,541 and $589,516 in restitution, respectively, the amounts paid by Medicare for their fraudulent claims. The sentences were imposed by U.S. District Judge Denise Page Hood of the Eastern District of Michigan in Detroit.

All three defendants were convicted on Sept. 30, 2014, after a 12-week jury trial in the Eastern District of Michigan. Williams was convicted of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and conspiracy to receive health care kickbacks. Abdul Malik Al-Jumail and Jamella Al-Jumail were each found guilty of conspiracy to commit health care fraud. Abdul Malik Al-Jumail was also found guilty of conspiracy to pay and receive health care kickbacks. Jamella Al-Jumail was also found guilty of destroying documents in connection with a federal investigation.

According to the evidence at trial, Williams billed Medicare, through her company, Haven Adult Day Care Center LLC, for psychotherapy services that were not actually provided. The evidence demonstrated that, in some instances, Williams billed Medicare for services purportedly provided to patients who were already deceased. Williams also sold the private medical information of her patients to Abdul Malik Al-Jumail so that he could use it to submit fraudulent claims to Medicare.

The evidence further showed that Abdul Malik Al-Jumail obtained patients by paying unlawful kickbacks to Williams and others, and caused claims to be submitted to Medicare for home health services, including physical therapy, that were never delivered. Like her father, the evidence demonstrated that Jamella Al-Jumail billed Medicare for home health services and physical therapy that were not actually provided. The evidence at trial also showed that, the day her father was arrested, Jamella Al-Jumail told an employee to retrieve falsified patient medical records from their company, which she and others later burned.

The case was investigated by the FBI, HHS-OIG and the IRS, and was brought as part of the Medicare Fraud Strike Force, under the supervision of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Michigan. The case was prosecuted by Trial Attorneys Christopher Cestaro, Brooke Harper and William Kanellis of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section, and Assistant U.S. Attorney Patrick Hurford of the Eastern District of Michigan.

Since its inception in March 2007, the Medicare Fraud Strike Force, now operating in nine cities across the country, has charged nearly 2,100 defendants who have collectively billed the Medicare program for more than $6.5 billion. In addition, the HHS Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, working in conjunction with the HHS-OIG, are taking steps to increase accountability and decrease the presence of fraudulent providers.

To learn more about the Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Team (HEAT), go to: www.stopmedicarefraud.gov.

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