U.S. Attorney's Office
Northern District of Texas
(214) 659-8600
November 21, 2014

Federal Grand Jury Indicts Members of Violent South Dallas Drug Trafficking Organization on Conspiracy, Drug Trafficking, Firearm, Kidnapping, Witness Intimidation/Tampering, and Destruction of Records Charges

DALLAS—A 10-count indictment was returned by a federal grand jury in Dallas this week that charges 11 men and women from the Dallas area with various conspiracy, drug trafficking, kidnapping, firearm, witness intimidation/tampering, and records destruction charges stemming from their involvement in a violent drug trafficking operation (DTO) that operated out of the Pleasant Grove area of South Dallas and the Dallas County Jail. The announcement was made today by U.S. Attorney Sarah R. Saldaña of the Northern District of Texas.

Defendants charged and in custody are:

  • Patrick D. Lenard, 33, of Pleasant Grove, South Dallas. For significant periods since November 26, 2012, Lenard was incarcerated at Dallas County Jail.
  • Juaquai Gregg, of Dallas. Between approximately November 12, 2012, and March 31, 2014, Gregg was incarcerated at Dallas County Jail.
  • Joshua Smart, 26, of Dallas. Between approximately December 3, 2012, to November 4, 2014, Smart was incarcerated at Dallas County Jail.
  • Shuntocqua Shine, 33, of Dallas. Between approximately November 13, 2012, to November 20, 2012, Shine was incarcerated at Dallas County Jail. She also managed and operated the Groveside Tobacco Gallery on N. Jim Miller Road in Dallas.
  • Brandon Florence, a/k/a “Beetlejuice,” 30, of Dallas
  • Lashundra Rogers, 35, of Mesquite, Texas. She was one of Lenard’s girlfriends.
  • Selena Ball, 29, of Desoto, Texas. From September 23, 2013, to May 27, 2013, Ball worked as an Electronic Monitoring Officer for the Dallas County Community Supervision and Corrections Department, and was assigned to monitor Lenard. She was also one of Lenard’s girlfriends.
  • Rory Minafee, 26, of Dallas
  • Bonner Ray Tutson, 50, of Dallas

Two additional defendants, Rodney Wynn, 34, of Kaufman, Texas, and Christina Staton, 38, of Dallas, are also charged in the indictment. Wynn was added to the State of Texas’s most wanted list in September 2014 and remains a fugitive. Staton, who, according to the indictment is referred to by the derogatory term “Fatass,” is also a fugitive.

The indictment alleges that Lenard conspired with his 10 codefendants, and others, to run the DTO from approximately July 12, 2012, to November 4, 2014. The DTO trafficked in large quantities of cocaine, heroin and marijuana. In furtherance of its drug-trafficking activities, the Lenard DTO also engaged in violent acts, including kidnapping, assault, beatings, and torture, towards, and of, individuals whom Lenard believed had defied or crossed the Lenard DTO, including his own family members. In addition, the indictment alleges the Lenard DTO intimidated and bribed individuals whom the DTO believed might assist law enforcement in investigating and prosecuting it. The Lenard DTO also took actions to subvert and manipulate state investigative and legal proceedings against the organization.

Count one of the indictment alleges that in November 2012, Lenard, Wynn, Gregg, Smart and Shine conspired to kidnap, and kidnapped, “Victim A.” They captured and assaulted Victim A at gunpoint. Once captured, they took Victim A to an apartment where Victim A was beaten and tortured in an effort to locate cash and other things of value they believed Victim A had taken from the Lenard DTO. Lenard had offered Shine $10,000 to locate Victim A. If convicted on this count, each faces a maximum statutory penalty of life in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count two of the indictment charges Lenard, Wynn, Gregg, Smart and Shine with using, carrying, and brandishing a firearm during or in relation to the kidnapping. If convicted on this count, each faces a statutory penalty of not less than seven years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count three of the indictment charges Lenard, Wynn, Gregg, Smart and Shine with kidnapping Victim A. If convicted on this count, each faces a maximum statutory penalty of life in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count four of the indictment charges all 11 defendants with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, one kilogram or more of heroin, and marijuana. It alleges that from July 12, 2012, to November 4, 2014, the Lenard DTO maintained stash houses for illegal narcotics, negotiated and discussed drug transactions over their cell phones and from phones maintained at the Dallas County Jail; used violence and threats of violence to enforce the Lenard DTO’s goals; recruited and convinced individuals who were responsible for reporting illegal activities to alter, modify, and fail to report those activities; and obstructed or attempted to obstruct the investigation and prosecution of members of the Lenard DTO.

Lenard admitted in a state court proceeding that he and Ball were engaged in a romantic relationship despite her position and the clear conflict. Lenard convinced her to alter, modify, or fail to report violations of Lenard’s conditions of release. Ball purposefully failed to report violations of those conditions by Lenard, who had violated them by approaching, confronting, and attempting to intimidate coconspirators and witnesses to the above-mentioned kidnapping.

If convicted on this count, each faces a statutory penalty of not less than 10 years and up to life in federal prison and a millions in fines.

Count five of the indictment charges Lenard, Florence, Staton, Rogers and Ball with conspiring to intimidate, threaten, corruptly persuade, and engage in misleading conduct toward Victim A to ignore a federal grand jury subpoena and by intimidating Victim A with regard to Victim A’s cooperation with law enforcement. If convicted on this count, each faces a maximum statutory penalty of 20 years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count six of the indictment charges Lenard, Florence, Staton, Rogers and Ball with conspiring to tamper with a witness, victim or informant by intimidation, threats, corrupt persuasion or misleading conduct. They attempted to convince Victim A to ignore a federal grand jury subpoena and paid money to Victim A to leave the State of Texas. If convicted on this count, each faces a maximum statutory penalty of 20 years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count seven of the indictment charges Ball with destruction, alteration or falsification of records. It alleges that she knowingly altered, destroyed, concealed, covered up, falsified or made a false entry in electronic monitoring records with the intent to impede, obstruct and influence an investigation. If convicted on this count, Ball faces a maximum statutory penalty of 20 years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count eight charges Minafee with one count of possession of cocaine with intent to distribute. If convicted on this count, Minafee faces a maximum statutory penalty of 20 years in federal prison and a $1 million fine.

Count nine charges Minafee with possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. If convicted on this count, Minafee faces a maximum statutory penalty of five years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine.

Count ten charges Tutson with possession of marijuana with intent to distribute. If convicted on this count, Tutson faces a maximum statutory penalty of 20 years in federal prison and a $1 million fine.

A federal indictment is an accusation by a grand jury. A defendant is entitled to the presumption of innocence unless proven guilty.

The ongoing investigation is being led by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS), the Drug Enforcement Administration, the FBI and the Dallas Police Department.

Assistant U.S. Attorneys Errin Martin and P. J. Meitl are prosecuting.

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