U.S. Attorney's Office
District of Massachusetts
(617) 748-3100
February 13, 2015

Leaders of the Hendry Street and Woodward Avenue Gangs Plead Guilty to Drug Trafficking and Firearm Charges

BOSTON—Alexis Hidalgo and Jonathan DaSilva, the respective leaders of two Boston street gangs—the Hendry Street Gang and the Woodward Avenue Gang—pleaded guilty today to drug trafficking and firearm charges.

Hidalgo, 34, and DaSilva, 31, both of Boston, each pleaded guilty before U.S. District Court Judge Rya W. Zobel to conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine, cocaine, marijuana, and oxycodone, as well as firearm related charges. In January 2013, Hidalgo and DaSilva were two of 29 defendants charged with drug trafficking and firearm charges arising out of Operation Concord, a joint investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Police Department, Massachusetts State Police, and Homeland Security Investigations that focused on gang violence and drug dealing in the Henry Street and Woodward Avenue areas of Boston. During the course of Operation Concord, law enforcement officials seized approximately $400,000 in cash, guns, jewelry, gold and silver bars, and several luxury vehicles.

From August 2011 through January 2013, Hidalgo and DaSilva, the respective heads of the Hendry Street and Woodward Avenue gangs, ran a lucrative drug trafficking business distributing crack cocaine, cocaine, marijuana, and oxycodone which was in turn distributed in Boston, Brockton, and Maine.

Hidalgo and DaSilva operated their drug business out of two primary locations: a house at 37 Hendry Street in Boston and a house known as “the Trap” at 36 Woodward Avenue in Boston. Customers seeking crack and marijuana would go to 37 Hendry Street to purchase drugs from gang members who stored the drugs and cooked cocaine into crack in the second floor apartment. In August 2012, 37 Hendry Street was shut down by the City of Boston as a result of numerous neighborhood complaints of drug and gang activity.

“The Trap” at 36 Woodward Avenue, which was run by DaSilva, operated as a round-the-clock distribution center for crack, oxycodone, cocaine and marijuana. When 37 Hendry Street was shut down, Hidalgo transferred his crack business to 36 Woodward Avenue.

Hidalgo and DaSilva used gang members to distribute and store drugs, drug proceeds, and to carry out gang-related missions. For example, on Oct. 23, 2012, DaSilva directed gang member Patrick “Pistol” Gomes to obtain a firearm and go to Roxbury District Courthouse to assist a fellow gang member who was “trapped” by a rival gang member. Gomes asked DaSilva if he had a “greenlight” to shoot if necessary and DaSilva gave Gomes the go-ahead. Investigators had Gomes stopped in his rental car by the police outside of the Roxbury courthouse where officers seized a fully loaded Ruger P89 semiautomatic handgun from the glove box. On Feb. 4, 2015, Gomes pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute cocaine base and marijuana and being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition.

The charging statutes provide a sentence of no less than 10 years and up to a lifetime in prison, a minimum of five years and up to a lifetime of supervised release, and a fine of $10 million on the charge of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances; no greater than 20 years in prison, a minimum of three years and up to a lifetime of supervised release, and a fine of $10 million on the charges of distribution of controlled substances; no greater than 10 years in prison, a minimum of three years and up to a lifetime of supervised release, and a fine of $250,000 on the charge of being a felon in possession of a firearm. Pursuant to their respective plea agreements with the government, and pending acceptance by the district court at sentencing, Hidalgo has agreed to a sentence of 144-168 months in prison and DaSilva has agreed to a sentence of 120-168 months in prison. Both defendants also agreed to the forfeiture of cash, jewelry, and luxury vehicles.

United States Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz; Vincent B. Lisi, Special Agent in Charge of Federal Bureau of Investigation, Boston Field Division; Colonel Timothy P. Alben, Superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police; and Bruce M. Foucart, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Boston, made the announcement. The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Emily Cummings of Ortiz’s Organized Crime and Gang Unit.

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