FBI, This Week: Crisis Response Canines


December 23, 2015

The FBI’s new Crisis Response Canines helped the San Bernardino Shooting victims and their families.


Audio Transcript

Mollie Halpern: The FBI’s new Crisis Response Canines helped the San Bernardino Shooting victims and their families.

English Labrador Retrievers Gio and Wally recently became part of the FBI’s Office for Victim Assistance.

In between the squeaks from Gio’s toy ball, Assistant Director Kathryn Turman explains how the Labs are another tool to help victims cope with the impact of crime.

Kathryn Turman: These dogs are very specialized. It takes a lot of time and effort to train them and to train their handlers.

Halpern: Melody Tiddle, Gio’s handler, brought the black-furred 2-year-old to visit the injured in the hospitals. She says Gio and Wally’s presence calmed the victims.

Melody Tiddle: It’s backed by science—basic interaction with a dog increases oxytocin, which helps to lower blood pressure, relieve stress and anxiety.

Halpern: The canines also help FBI employees who work in high-crisis situations.

Turman: It’s the first time I’ve seen some of these people who work very intense jobs really kind of relax and smile and laugh. It really does help.

Halpern: With FBI, This Week, I’m Mollie Halpern of the Bureau.

 

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