FBI, This Week: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math at the FBI


June 24, 2016

The FBI develops cutting-edge technology and uses science to help fulfill its mission of protecting the United States from terrorism and other crimes.


Audio Transcript

Mollie Halpern: The FBI develops cutting-edge technology and uses science to help fulfill its mission of protecting the United States from terrorism and other crimes.

Amy Hess: When we talk about the FBI and trying to realize the ways that we can better protect the American public and the nation from threats and to bring people to justice, I don’t think people immediately think of how that relates to people who have backgrounds in science or technology or engineering or math. I think people are focused on the agent perspective and the investigator. But in today’s world, every investigation is touched by science and technology.

Halpern: That was Amy Hess, the FBI’s executive assistant director of the Science and Technology Branch. The FBI—and her branch in particular—offers a variety of careers in science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM.

Hess: From chemists and biologists to physical scientists to forensic scientists at the Lab. I have mathematicians, computer scientists, electronics technicians, electronic engineers, cryptanalysts, technically trained agents, IT specialists, computer scientists. I have people with a whole variety of architectural or accounting backgrounds as well.

Halpern: Hess, who has a background in aeronautical and astronautical engineering, will address some of the nation’s finest students at The Congress of Future Science and Technology Leaders next month in Boston. She hopes to inspire them to pursue their passion in STEM careers at the FBI.

Hess: To work alongside some of the best and brightest minds in the FBI who are looking at these problems that we have, to try to protect the American people from threats—from bad things happening; try to identify—if those bad things do happen—who did them? And those people have tremendous skills and abilities. And to have an opportunity to work alongside them and to learn from them and to mentored by them...if I was a high school student today, I would think, “Where do I sign up?”

Halpern: With FBI, This Week, I’m Mollie Halpern of the Bureau.

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