FBI, This Week: Skimming Prevention Tips


November 7, 2019

All it can take is a swipe of your credit or debit card for your personally identifiable information to end up on the dark web.


Audio Transcript

Mollie Halpern: All it can take is a swipe of your credit or debit card for your personally identifiable information to end up on the dark web.

It’s called skimming and involves the installation of devices on ATMs, fuel pumps, and other point-of-sale terminals to steal your card data.

FBI Supervisory Special Agent Parker Still suggests keeping an eye out for pinhole cameras and other devices…

Parker Still: Observe your area. Instead of just blindly put your debit or credit card into the gas pumps or to the ATM, look at the actual device. See if something maybe stand out to you that this is just a little bit unusual.

Halpern: To help determine if an illegal overlay data capturing device is installed on a card reader, Supervisory Special Agent Zacharia Baldwin suggests…

Zacharia Baldwin: I always tug on the machine. If it starts to move around, don't use it.

Halpern: Skimming is a pervasive crime that transnational criminal organizations are committing across the country in rural and urban areas alike.

It impacts your wallet—and causes billions of dollars in losses to the U.S. economy.

Still: We advise folks to monitor their credit. Check your credit. Monitor for any type of suspicious activity. Also, be in communication with your bank, have alerts set up where if a certain dollar amount threshold is used, that you get some type of alert. Just little things like that can go a long way in preventing a loss and a lot of hassle.

Halpern: With FBI, This Week I’m Mollie Halpern of the Bureau.

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