FBI, This Week: Restoring the Identities of Unknown Human Remains


February 15, 2018

The FBI and the non-profit organization NamUs observe the one-year anniversary of their partnership, which works to identify unknown human remains.


Audio Transcript

Mollie Halpern: The FBI and a non-profit observe the one-year anniversary of their partnership, which works to identify unknown human remains.

FBI forensic examiners processed 1,500 fingerprint records of unknown and missing people from a database belonging to NamUs—the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System.

Chief of the Latent Print Support Unit Kimberly Edwards says the oldest record they examined dated back to 1975.

Kimberly Edwards: Typically the condition of those individuals are not ideal—they are waterlogged or burned or decomposed. So often times the fingerprint recordings are not clear.

Halpern: Despite the challenges, within three months Edwards’ team identified 193 people using the FBI’s Next Generation Identification system, known as NGI.

Among those identified were 25 homicide victims.

Edwards: By providing an identity of these individuals, we’re able to open up more investigative leads as to what actually occurred in that case.

Halpern: Learn more about NGI at www.fbi.gov. With FBI, This Week, I’m Mollie Halpern of the Bureau.

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