FBI, This Week: Study of Pre-Attack Behaviors of Active Shooters Released


June 21, 2018

An FBI study examined different factors in the lives of 63 active shooters who committed their crimes between 2000 and 2013 and determined they exhibit an average of four to five warning behaviors to those they know before they attack.


Audio Transcript

Mollie Halpern: An FBI study shows active shooters exhibit an average of four to five warning behaviors to those they know before they attack.

Active shooters display these warning signs through problematic interpersonal interactions and even communicate about their intent to harm others.

The Study of Pre-Attack Behaviors of Active Shooters in the U.S. examined different factors in the lives of 63 active shooters who committed their crimes between 2000 and 2013.

Dr. Sarah Craun of the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit …

Dr. Sarah Craun: These were not people who just snapped. Rather, they had stressors in their lives.

Halpern: The study also found that in many cases when these concerning behaviors were demonstrated, those who witnessed them did nothing.

Supervisory Special Agent Andre Simons says one of the reasons for the study was to identify ways to detect and disrupt potential active shooters.

Andre Simons: Anybody who is in a position to observe behaviors, to recognize that they are problematic, and to take action to prevent an active shooting from occurring, we think will benefit from reading this study.

Halpern: To learn how you can help prevent active shootings, visit www.fbi.gov

With FBI, This Week, I’m Mollie Halpern of the Bureau.

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