Home Stats & Services Reports and Publications LEB July 2012 Bulletin Notes

Bulletin Notes

Bulletin Notes

Bulletin Notes

Law enforcement officers are challenged daily in the performance of their duties; they face each challenge freely and unselfishly while answering the call to duty. In certain instances, their actions warrant special attention from their respective departments. The Bulletin also wants to recognize those situations that transcend the normal rigors of the law enforcement profession.

Officer Peterson
Officer Peterson

Officer Ginger Peterson of the Cheyenne, Wyoming, Police Department responded to an emergency call about a local house fire. Arriving at the scene before the fire department, she discovered flames breaching the northwest window of the home and spreading rapidly. She soon learned that occupants still were inside and, without hesitation, entered the basement apartment of the burning building. Officer Peterson woke up two women in the apartment and located a third person, all unaware of the fire above them. After rapidly escorting the three to safety, she gathered the occupants of the main floor, which consisted of two small children and their mother, and put them in her car to keep them from the cold and snowy conditions outside. Because of Officer Peterson’s quick action, all the occupants of the home escaped without injury.

Deputy Keven Rowan
Deputy Rowan

Deputy Keven Rowan of the Rockwall County, Texas, Sheriff’s Office was patrolling a reservoir area in the early morning when he noticed a vehicle in the water. It appeared the driver had maneuvered down an adjacent boat ramp. Upon closer inspection, he saw two young women trapped in the car, unable to open the doors or windows. Deputy Rowan removed his equipment belt and swam about 30 yards out to the car, where it was sinking under 10 to 12 feet of water. He used a glass-breaking device to gain entry and pulled both women out just as the vehicle fully submerged. As neither of the women could swim, Deputy Rowan carried them both to a point where his feet could touch the bottom, then helped them to safety up the nearby boat ramp.


Nominations for the Bulletin Notes should be based on either the rescue of one or more citizens or arrest(s) made at unusual risk to an officer’s safety. Submissions should include a short write-up (maximum of 250 words), a separate photograph of each nominee, and a letter from the department’s ranking officer endorsing the nomination. Submissions can be mailed to the Editor, FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, FBI Academy, Quantico, VA 22135 or e-mailed to leb@fbiacademy.edu. Some published submissions may be chosen for inclusion in the Hero Story segment of the television show “America’s Most Wanted.”

07.26.12

March 2012 LEB Table of Contents

Table of Contents
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Back to the Cover

Focus on Psychopathy

Psychopathy
An Important Forensic Concept for the 21st Century
By Paul Babiak, M.S., Ph.D.; Jorge Folino, M.D., Ph.D.; Jeffrey Hancock, Ph.D.; Robert D. Hare, Ph.D.; Matthew Logan, Ph.D., M.Ed.; Elizabeth Leon Mayer, Ph.D.; J. Reid Meloy, Ph.D.; Helinä Häkkänen-Nyholm, Ph.D.; Mary Ellen O’Toole, Ph.D.; Anthony Pinizzotto, Ph.D.; Stephen Porter, Ph.D.; Sharon Smith, Ph.D.; and Michael Woodworth, Ph.D.

Perspective
The Predator
When the Stalker Is a Psychopath
By Sharon S. Smith, Ph.D., Mary Ellen O’Toole, Ph.D., and Robert D. Hare, Ph.D.

Looking Behind the Mask
Implications for Interviewing Psychopaths
By Mary Ellen O’Toole, Ph.D.; Matt Logan, Ph.D.; and Sharon Smith, Ph.D.

Case Study
No More Bagpipes
The Threat of the Psychopath
By Matt Logan, Ph.D.

The Language of Psychopaths
New Findings and Implications for Law Enforcement
By Michael Woodworth, Ph.D.; Jeffrey Hancock, Ph.D.; Stephen Porter, Ph.D.; Robert Hare, Ph.D.; Matt Logan, Ph.D.; Mary Ellen O’Toole, Ph.D.; and Sharon Smith, Ph.D.

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