Home Seattle Press Releases 2012 Man Sentenced to Five Years for Assaulting a Child

Man Sentenced to Five Years for Assaulting a Child

U.S. Attorney’s Office October 17, 2012
  • Eastern District of Washington (509) 353-2767

SPOKANE, WA—Today, Michael C. Ormsby, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington, announced that LaShuan Roman Nose, age 33, of Elk City, Oklahoma, was sentenced after having been convicted by a jury of assault resulting in substantial bodily injury in connection with the abuse of a toddler. Senior District Court Judge Edward F. Shea imposed the statutory maximum sentence of five years’ imprisonment, to be followed by three years of court supervision upon release from prison. Roman Nose has a lengthy criminal history.

By indictment dated July 12, 2011, Roman Nose was charged with a crime on an Indian Reservation; that is, assault resulting in substantial bodily injury. A jury trial commenced on May 29, 2012, and the evidence showed that in May, 2011, Yakama Nation Tribal Police officers responded to a call of possible child abuse. The officers arrived at the residence and later observed a toddler who had suffered multiple injuries. The officers observed that the child suffered approximately 15-20 one-inch long bruises. Additional injuries were observed on the child’s legs. Detectives with the Yakama Nation Tribal Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation immediately launched an investigation. The law enforcement officers learned that Roman Nose had repeatedly struck the toddler with numerous objects because the child had experienced difficulties with potty training. On May 31, 2012, the jury found Roman Nose guilty as charged.

Michael C. Ormsby said, “The United States Attorney’s Office, the Yakama Nation Tribal Police Department, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation are committed to protecting children who suffer abuse at the hands of adults. We will investigate and prosecute such offenses and seek the maximum penalty upon conviction.”

This investigation was conducted by the Yakama Nation Tribal Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. This case was prosecuted by Tom Hanlon an Assistant United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington.