Home San Juan Press Releases 2013 Arrest of Carlos Rosario-Delgado in Connection with Carjacking

Arrest of Carlos Rosario-Delgado in Connection with Carjacking

FBI San Juan September 26, 2013
  • Special Agent Moises Quiñones (787) 759-1550

On September 25, 2013, Carlos Rosario-Delgado was taken into custody by the FBI. Rosario was charged with carjacking.

A federal complaint states that on September 25, 2013, shortly after 8:00 p.m., Rosario approached a stationary vehicle parked in front of Gran China Restaurant, located on the corner of Manuel Domenech Avenue and Cesar L. Gonzalez Avenue. As the driver of the vehicle opened his door to exit, Rosario placed his right hand on the driver’s upper back and brandished a silver knife at the victim with his left hand. Rosario then demanded that the victim get out of the vehicle.

The victim, fearing for his life, complied with Rosario’s orders. Rosario fled the scene, traveling northbound toward Muñoz Rivera Avenue. As Rosario left, the victim was able to alert a police patrol unit in the area and advised of the patrol the situation. A police pursuit ensued shortly thereafter. Rosario’s attempts to evade police resulted in him crashing the vehicle into a Toyota Yaris on Muñoz Rivera Ave.

After impacting the vehicle, the subject continued to flee without stopping. The high-speed vehicle pursuit eventually ended on Road 181 after a police vehicle forced the vehicle to stop. Afterwards, Rosario was apprehended and taken to the police station.

If convicted, the defendant faces up to a maximum of 15 years’ imprisonment for taking a vehicle from a person by force and violence or by intimidation (carjacking).

This case is being prosecuted by Special Assistant United States Attorney Max Perez-Bouret and is being investigated by the Save Our Streets (SOS) Task Force, composed of FBI, Police of Puerto Rico, and the San Juan Municipal Police.

The public is reminded that a criminal complaint contains only charges and is not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed to be innocent until and unless proven guilty. The U.S. government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.