Home Salt Lake City Press Releases 2012 Alex Medicine Horse Sentenced in U.S. District Court

Alex Medicine Horse Sentenced in U.S. District Court

U.S. Attorney’s Office October 31, 2012
  • District of Montana (406) 657-6101

The United States Attorney’s Office announced that during a federal court session in Billings, on October 31, 2012, before Chief U.S. District Judge Richard F. Cebull, Alex Medicine Horse, a 69-year-old resident of Lodge Grass and an enrolled member of the Crow Indian Tribe, appeared for sentencing. Medicine Horse was sentenced to a term of:

  • Prison: 360 months
  • Special assessment: $100
  • Supervised release: 10 years

Medicine Horse was sentenced after a federal district court trial in which he was found guilty of aggravated sexual abuse. Assistant U.S. Attorney E. Vincent Carroll prosecuted the case for the United States.

At trial, the following evidence and testimony was presented to the jury.

While a 6-year-old child was undergoing a medical examination at the Children’s Clinic in Billings, she disclosed that Medicine Horse had touched her “private part” with his hands. The incident took place at a residence in Lodge Grass, which is within the exterior boundaries of the Crow Indian Reservation.

On November 4, 2010, Medicine Horse was interviewed regarding the victim’s allegations, and he denied ever touching her in a sexual manner. Afterward, however, he confessed that he had put the victim on his lap, had inserted his hand inside her underwear, and had touched her vaginal area for approximately one minute. Medicine Horse also stated that he had not been truthful earlier in the interview because he “did not want to get into trouble.” Following the interview, a tape-recorded statement was given by Medicine Horse.

The victim also disclosed to her older sister and to a cousin what Medicine Horse had done to her. Specifically, the victim disclosed that Medicine Horse had touched her in her private part.

Assistant U.S. Attorney E. Vincent Carroll prosecuted the case for the United States.

Because there is no parole in the federal system, the “truth in sentencing” guidelines mandate that Medicine Horse will likely serve all of the time imposed by the court. In the federal system, Medicine Horse does have the opportunity to earn a sentence reduction for “good behavior.” However, this reduction will not exceed 15 percent of the overall sentence.

The investigation was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.