Home Salt Lake City Press Releases 2011 Adrian Broken Rope Pleads Guilty in U.S. Federal Court

Adrian Broken Rope Pleads Guilty in U.S. Federal Court

U.S. Attorney’s Office December 07, 2011
  • District of Montana (406) 657-6101

The United States Attorney’s Office announced that during a federal court session in Billings on December 7, 2011, before Senior U.S. District Judge Jack D. Shanstrom, ADRIAN URIAH BROKEN ROPE, a 25-year-old resident of Lodge Grass, pled guilty to involuntary manslaughter and three counts of assault resulting in serious bodily injury. Sentencing has been set for March 7, 2012. He is currently detained.

In an offer of proof filed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Vince Carroll, the government stated it would have proved at trial the following:

On May 5, 2011, a motor vehicle accident was reported on the Crow Indian Reservation. Responding emergency personnel and witnesses observed BROKEN ROPE “pinned” behind the wheel of the vehicle. “XX”, a passenger in BROKEN ROPE’s vehicle, was pronounced dead at the scene. Three other passengers, “AA,” “BB,” and “CC,” were transported to nearby medical facilities for medical treatment.

An investigation was immediately initiated into this matter. As part of the investigation, occupants of the car involved were interviewed. Those with a recollection attested that BROKEN ROPE was the driver. Initial medical information indicated that BROKEN ROPE had a blood alcohol level of above 0.260 at the time of the crash. Additionally, analysis of the crash site by Montana Highway Patrol troopers suggested BROKEN ROPE was exceeding the posted speed limit immediately prior to the crash.

An autopsy confirmed “XX’s” death was caused by injuries sustained during the crash. The three other passengers each sustained injuries that constituted serious bodily injury as a result of the crash.

BROKEN ROPE is an enrolled member of the Crow Tribe and the crash took place near Lodge Grass on the Crow Indian Reservation.

BROKEN ROPE faces possible penalties of eight years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years’ supervised release for involuntary manslaughter and possible penalties of 10 years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years’ supervised release on each count of assault resulting in serious bodily injury.

The investigation was a cooperative effort between the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Montana Highway Patrol.

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