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The FBI recently completed a project that converted 8.8 million criminal records from paper to automation, closing a more than 50-year gap in access to criminal history information.

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Automation of Criminal History

03/20/2014
 

Mollie Halpern: The FBI recently completed a project that converted 8.8 million criminal records from paper to automation, closing a more than 50-year gap in access to criminal history information. Kimberly Del Greco of the Criminal Justice Information Services Division…

Kimberly Del Greco: We’ll have, for the first time ever, all of our records automated in one location accessible electronically across the nation.

Halpern: The automation provides local, state, and federal law enforcement real-time access to criminal histories, intelligence, and investigative leads.

Del Greco: They want to have instantaneous access to information so they know if there is a dangerous situation.

Halpern: It will also give information to employment agencies running background checks on prospective employees.

The conversion process from paper records to automation began in the 1980s. So what became of the more than 1,000 file cabinets that weighed 230 pounds each and the paper inside of them?

Del Greco: We were able to coordinate with a local company to have them recycled.

Halpern: From FBI Headquarters, I’m Mollie Halpern of the Bureau with FBI, This Week.

 

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