Home News News Blog

News Blog

Found 1082 posts.
Mar 17, 2015 02:00 PM

Still Seeking Clues in Biggest Art Theft in U.S. History

It was 25 years ago, on March 18, 1990, that two men dressed as police officers gained access to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston and stole 13 objects valued at approximately $500 ...

Still Seeking Clues in Biggest Art Theft in U.S. History


It was 25 years ago, on March 18, 1990, that two men dressed as police officers gained access to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston and stole 13 objects valued at approximately $500 million. In addition to artwork by Degas and Rembrandt, they took a Vermeer painting that was one of only 36 in existence.

In 2013, the museum offered a $5 million reward “for information that leads directly to the recovery of all of our items in good condition.”

The FBI’s Boston Field Office has diligently investigated the case—in partnership with the museum and the Massachusetts U.S. Attorney’s Office—following leads around the world. The case represents the largest property crime in U.S. history.

Two years ago, FBI.gov profiled the theft and interviewed officials about the investigation and released high-resolution images of the stolen pieces. The FBI is still seeking tips and information that will lead to the recovery of the stolen artwork.

Full Story | Photo Gallery

Mar 17, 2015 12:30 PM

Financial Fraud Scheme in Hollywood

The owners of Gigapix Studios told investors they were going to make an animated version of the “Wizard of Oz” called “OZ3D,” and those who got in on the ground floor could make a killing. But the ...

Financial Fraud Scheme in Hollywood

The owners of Gigapix Studios told investors they had a sure thing: They were going to make an animated version of the Wizard of Oz called OZ3D, and those who got in on the ground floor—and the company’s imminent public offering—could make a killing.

Unfortunately, the film was a bigger fairy tale than investors bargained for, and approximately 730 people lost millions of dollars. For some, the investment represented their life savings.

Full story

Mar 13, 2015 05:45 PM

Law Enforcement and Race: Continuing the Conversation

The sometimes uneasy relationship between members of law enforcement and the diverse communities they serve can be a difficult topic to discuss, but in a speech to members of the National ...

Law Enforcement and Race: Continuing the Conversation

The sometimes uneasy relationship between members of law enforcement and the diverse communities they serve can be a difficult topic to discuss, but FBI Director James B. Comey today encouraged the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) to continue that conversation—and he again called for better reporting of incidents where force is used by police and against them.

During a speech to the NOBLE group in Atlanta, Georgia, Comey noted that the organization’s members were “uniquely qualified as law enforcement leaders who are leaders of color” to drive this conversation forward, and he pledged that the FBI would strive to be a more diverse organization to reflect the nation it serves.

Full story and video

Mar 12, 2015 04:45 PM

Possible Lead in Case of Missing Ohio Girl

The FBI is asking for help from the public in the case of Ashley Summers, who went missing in July 2007 from Cleveland, Ohio when she was 14 years old. Recent surveillance photos obtained in Rhode ...

Possible Lead in Case of Missing Ohio Girl

The FBI is asking for help from the public in the case of Ashley Summers, who went missing in July 2007 from Cleveland, Ohio when she was 14 years old.

Recent surveillance photos depicting an unidentified male and female—obtained on October 22, 2014, by the Warwick (Rhode Island) Police Department—have led authorities to believe that they may have traveled together through areas of Warwick, East Providence, and Pawtucket, Rhode Island, as well as Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. Surveillance photos of the female (one of which is shown above on the right) are of particular interest to the FBI because the pictures bear a strong resemblance to Ashley Summers (left photo). And while the Bureau realizes that the unidentified female may have no connection to Ashley Summers, we consider this a potential lead that must be followed because of the physical similarities.

Anyone with any information on this unidentified female should contact your local FBI office or nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

Missing Person poster - Ashley Summers

Mar 12, 2015 11:00 AM

FBI Director Testifies at FY 2016 Appropriations Hearing

Appearing today before a U.S. Senate appropriations subcommittee, Director James Comey briefed members on the FBI’s fiscal year 2016 budget request and on the wide range of threats, crime problems, ...

FBI Director Testifies at FY 2016 Appropriations Hearing

Appearing today before a U.S. Senate appropriations subcommittee, Director James Comey briefed members on the FBI’s fiscal year 2016 budget request and on the wide range of threats, crime problems, and operational challenges facing the Bureau and the nation.

According to Comey, preventing terrorist attacks continues to be the FBI’s top priority. “The terrorist threat against the United States remains persistent and acute,” he explained, especially threats posed by homegrown violent extremists and by foreign fighters—including those recruited from the U.S.—traveling to join ISIL. He cited the use of the Internet and social media by terror groups to recruit and to encourage attacks. But Comey also highlighted collaboration with our domestic and foreign partners and the capabilities of our Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center (TEDAC) as examples of how we work to combat the terror threat to the U.S.

The Bureau also remains focused on countering the threat from hostile foreign intelligence agencies looking for state and military secrets, commercial trade secrets, research and development information, and intellectual property, as well as on the growing scope of the insider threat—trusted employees and contractors who use their legitimate access to steal secrets. Said Comey, “These illicit activities pose a significant threat to national security.”

Another top priority, according to Comey, is the sophisticated cyber threat from state-sponsored hackers, hackers for hire, organized crime syndicates, and terrorists. In addition to using technical capabilities and traditional investigative techniques while working with partners in the U.S. and abroad, the FBI is engaged in other cyber efforts to identify threats, share information inside and outside of government, and develop and retain new cyber talent within the Bureau. “An element of virtually every national security threat and crime problem the FBI faces is cyber-based or facilitated,” testified Comey.

The FBI also continues to focus on a number of significant criminal threats—predominately worked in conjunction with local, state, federal, and, increasingly, international partners—such as public corruption (the top criminal priority for the FBI), violent crimes and gang activities, transnational organized crime, and crimes against children.

Comey discussed how the Bureau is using technology to “improve the way we collect, analyze, and share information,” specifically mentioning the new Next Generation Identification System and the upcoming Biometrics Technology Center. But he also talked about how the “rapid pace of advances in mobile and other communication technologies continue to present a challenge to conducting court-ordered electronic surveillance of criminals and terrorists.”

Full statement

Mar 11, 2015 11:30 AM

Ten Most Wanted Fugitives List is Turning 65 Years Old

The FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives program made its debut on March 14, 1950, and in the 65 years since then, 504 fugitives have been added to our list and 473 have been apprehended or located. Of ...

Ten Most Wanted Fugitives List is Turning 65 Years Old

Top Ten 65th Anniversary Logo

The FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives program made its debut on March 14, 1950, and in the 65 years since then, 504 fugitives have been added to our list and 473 have been apprehended or located. Of those 473, 156 were found as a direct result of citizen cooperation.

Also known as the Top Ten program, the original purpose of the initiative was to help publicize particularly dangerous fugitives who might not have merited nationwide attention. Early on, it was bank robbers and murder suspects fleeing state jurisdictions. But the list has evolved over time as a tool to search for major organized crime figures, cyber criminals, child predators, serial killers, and white-collar criminals who could be anywhere in the U.S. or even abroad. And while the original wanted posters were often pinned to post office walls or reprinted in newspapers and magazines, today—thanks to technology—we use the Internet, television, social media, and digital billboards to expand our reach even further when asking for the public’s assistance in locating these fugitives.

Some of the more infamous individuals named to the Top Ten list were Usama Bin Laden, James Earl Ray, Ted Bundy, Ramzi Yousef, Eric Robert Rudolph, and Katherine Ann Power. Most recently added to the list was Yaser Abdel Said, wanted for the murder of his two teenage daughters in Texas.

The public has always played—and continues to play—a vital role in our efforts to apprehend fugitives. If anyone has information concerning an individual on the Top Ten list, please contact your local FBI office or nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate, call the FBI’s toll-free tip line at 1-800-CALL-FBI (225-5324), or submit a tip online.

Press release | Current Top Ten list | More on the Most Wanted Fugitives program

Mar 10, 2015 05:00 PM

Adopt-A-School Program, Part 3: ‘I Promise to be a Good Citizen’

Bucknell Elementary School in Alexandria, Virginia was one of the first schools to embrace the FBI’s Adopt-A-School outreach program 20 years ago, and the program continues to have a positive ...

Adopt-A-School Program, Part 3: ‘I Promise to be a Good Citizen’

The nearly 30 sixth-graders at Bucknell Elementary School in Alexandria, Virginia stood at their desks, raised their right hands, and recited in unison a pledge they knew well: “I accept the position of junior special agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. I promise to be a good citizen. I will obey all the laws of my country and do my best in school. I will make the right choices by remaining drug free, staying in school, and practicing non-violent behavior in handling difficult situations.”

That pledge begins every session of the FBI’s Junior Special Agent Program, which aims to give fifth- and sixth-graders in disadvantaged neighborhoods the skills and discipline they need to steer clear of gangs, drugs, and crime.

Located just outside the District of Columbia, Bucknell was one of the first schools to embrace the FBI’s Adopt-A-School outreach program 20 years ago. Now, the Washington Field Office administers the program to six schools in and around the nation’s capital, dispatching agents and other Bureau employees throughout the school year to be tutors and mentors to more than 300 young people annually.

Full story, video, and photos

Mar 09, 2015 09:00 AM

Reward Increased to $5 Million in Robert Levinson Case

On March 9, 2007, retired FBI agent Robert Levinson went missing from Kish Island, Iran, and today, on the eighth anniversary of his disappearance, the FBI has increased its reward to up to $5 ...

Reward Increased to $5 Million in Robert Levinson Case


On March 9, 2007, retired FBI agent Robert Levinson went missing from Kish Island, Iran, and today, on the eighth anniversary of his disappearance, the FBI has increased its reward to up to $5 million for information leading directly to his safe location, recovery, and return. Levinson, who will turn 67 tomorrow, is now one of the longest-held American hostages in history.

“Today we mark eight years since Bob disappeared in Iran, and we are increasing the reward for his location and safe return to his family,” said FBI Director James B. Comey. “We ask anyone with information to contact the FBI. It is long past time for Bob to come home.”

Anyone with information regarding Levinson or his captors is encouraged to contact the FBI at https://tips.fbi.gov. Information will be kept confidential and can be provided anonymously.

More information and photos | Press release

Mar 04, 2015 12:15 PM

The Cyber Action Team

When major computer intrusions happen, the FBI’s Cyber Action Team—a rapid deployment group of cyber experts—can be on the scene just about anywhere in the world within 48 hours, providing ...

The Cyber Action Team

Man in Front of Cyber Wall

It can be a company’s worst nightmare—the discovery that hackers have infiltrated their computer networks and made off with trade secrets, customers’ personal information, and other critical data.

When such intrusions happen—and unfortunately, they occur frequently—the FBI can respond with a range of investigative assets, including the little-known Cyber Action Team. This rapid deployment group of cyber experts can be on the scene just about anywhere in the world within 48 hours, providing investigative support and helping to answer critical questions that can quickly move a case forward.

Full story

Mar 02, 2015 01:45 PM

Multi-State Fraudulent Document Ring Dismantled

Inside the case of a multi-state criminal organization that fraudulently obtained driver’s licenses and other documents such as student visas for illegal aliens and other ineligible individuals.

Multi-State Fraudulent Document Ring Dismantled

For the hundreds of individuals living in the U.S. illegally who responded to advertisements by Young-Kyu Park and his associates, the promise of an authentic visa or a valid driver’s license was well worth the $3,000 to $4,500 price tag.

Park, recently sentenced to six years in federal prison, was the leader of a multi-state criminal organization that fraudulently obtained driver’s licenses and other documents such as student visas for illegal aliens and other ineligible individuals.

Park was one of 22 people charged in 2012 with providing a range of illegal services predominantly to South Koreans who were illegally residing in the U.S. He was assisted in his criminal enterprise by brokers he employed around the country, along with a contract employee of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, who stole authentic forms that turned out to be central to the scheme.

Full story