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FBI Releases Notes of Serial Killer Israel Keyes

Israel Keyes, who committed suicide in his Alaska jail cell on December 2, 2012, is believed to have committed multiple kidnappings and murders across the U.S. between 2001 and March 2012. Yesterday, the FBI released the writings that were found beneath Keyes’ body after his death.

Feb 07, 2013 02:00 PM

FBI Releases Notes of Serial Killer Israel Keyes


Israel Keyes, who committed suicide in his Alaska jail cell on December 2, 2012, is believed to have committed multiple kidnappings and murders across the U.S. between 2001 and March 2012. Yesterday, the FBI released the writings that were found beneath Keyes’ body after his death. Unreadable and covered in blood, the notes were sent to the FBI Laboratory in Quantico, Virginia, where they were enhanced to a more legible condition for analysis and review. There was no hidden code or message in the writings, and no other investigative clues as to the identity of other possible victims were found. The notes remain difficult to read in parts, but the FBI is not planning on releasing a “translation” and will not offer any commentary on the meaning of the writings.

Arrested in Texas after kidnapping and killing an 18-year-old barista in Anchorage in February 2012, Keyes later admitted to murdering several other people—but he killed himself before investigators were able to learn more. To that end, the FBI is continuing to seek public assistance concerning Keyes’ extensive travels around the country to identify any of his additional victims. If you have information about Keyes, please contact 1-800-CALL-FBI, or submit a tip online.

- Read press release for more information, including a PDF of the notes, photos and an audio recording of Keyes, and a list of his known travels around the U.S. and parts of Canada.

More resources:
- Anchorage press release issued following Keyes’ suicide
- Related Dallas press release
- Anchorage press release announcing Keyes’ indictment