Home Cleveland Press Releases 2011 Seven Ohio Men Arrested for Hate Crime Attacks Against Amish Men

Seven Ohio Men Arrested for Hate Crime Attacks Against Amish Men

U.S. Attorney’s Office November 23, 2011
  • Northern District of Ohio (216) 622-3600

CLEVELAND—Seven Ohio men were arrested today on charges that they committed and conspired to commit religiously motivated physical assaults in violation of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Hate Crimes Prevention Act. The arrests were announced today by Thomas E. Perez, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division and Steven M. Dettelbach, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio.

The criminal complaint, filed in Cleveland, charges Samuel Mullet Sr., Johnny S. Mullet, Daniel S. Mullet, Levi F. Miller, Eli M. Miller and Emanuel Schrock, all of Bergholz, Ohio; and Lester S. Mullet, of Hammondsville, Ohio, with willfully causing bodily injury to any person, or attempting to do so by use of a dangerous weapon, because of the actual or perceived religion of that person. The maximum potential penalty for these violations is life in prison.

According to the affidavit filed in support of the arrest warrants, the defendants conspired to carry out a series of assaults against fellow Amish individuals with whom they were having a religiously based dispute. In doing so, the defendants forcibly restrained multiple Amish men and cut off their beards and head hair with scissors and battery-powered clippers, causing bodily injury to these men while also injuring others who attempted to stop the attacks. In the Amish religion, a man’s beard and head hair are sacred.

This case is being investigated by the Cleveland Division of the FBI and is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Bridget M. Brennan of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Ohio and Deputy Chief Kristy Parker of the Civil Rights Division’s Criminal Section.

A criminal complaint is merely an accusation. All defendants are presumed innocent of the charges until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in court.