Home Charlotte Press Releases 2014 Charlotte Man Sentenced to More Than 39 Years in Prison for Armed Robbery and Attemped Armed Robbery Charges...

Charlotte Man Sentenced to More Than 39 Years in Prison for Armed Robbery and Attemped Armed Robbery Charges

U. S. Attorney’s Office May 27, 2014
  • Western District of North Carolina (704) 344-6222

CHARLOTTE, NC—Chief U.S. District Judge Frank D. Whitney sentenced today Tony Humphrey, 20, of Charlotte, to 471 months in prison, followed by five years of supervised release, on charges stemming from an April 2012 armed robbery spree of several area businesses and a bank, announced Anne M. Tompkins, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina.

U.S. Attorney Tompkins is joined in making today’s announcement by John A. Strong, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Charlotte Division, and Chief Rodney D. Monroe, of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department.

According to court documents and today’s sentencing hearing, on two occasions, Humphreys committed armed robberies at two different branches of Regional Finance Corporation (Regional Finance). On April 3, 2012, Humphrey robbed the Regional Finance located on Tryon Street in Charlotte, stealing $2,000 in cash. Then, on April 16, 2012, Humphrey robbed a second Regional Finance branch located on E. Independence Boulevard, also in Charlotte; $3,400 was stolen from that location. On both occasions, Humphrey pointed a firearm at employees while he demanded money.

Also according to court documents and today’s sentencing hearing, Humphrey and his co-conspirator, Corey Miller, 25, attempted to commit two armed robberies. On April 6, 2012, Humphrey and Miller attempted to rob a Charlotte-area Sonic restaurant. Court records show that the two men placed an order at the drive through window, and then Humphrey entered the restaurant armed with a handgun and demanded money. According to court records, when a restaurant employee stated that she could not give him money, Humphrey pointed the gun at the employee’s head and pulled the trigger. The gun did not fire. Miller waited outside in the getaway car and drove Humphrey away from the scene. On April 14, 2012, Humphrey and Miller attempted to rob the Crown Auto Sales and Finance office located in Charlotte. Both Humphrey and Miller possessed and brandished firearms during that attempted robbery.

On April 13, 2012, Humphrey and Adonte Young, 28, robbed a PNC Bank branch located on East Boulevard in Charlotte. According to filed court documents and related court hearings, Humphrey and Young entered the bank and demanded cash. At least one of the two men was armed with and brandished a handgun. As they were leaving the bank with over $9,000 in cash, one of robbers fired two shots. Young and Humphrey fled the bank in a stolen vehicle which they abandoned. Police recovered a handgun, as well as a disguise worn by Young, from the stolen getaway car.

In January 2013, Humphrey pleaded guilty to two counts of Hobbs Act robbery, two counts of attempted Hobbs Act robbery, one count of armed bank robbery, and two counts of possessing and brandishing a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence.

In January 2013, Corey Miller pleaded guilty to the April 6, 2012 attempted Hobbs Act Robbery of the Sonic Restaurant and to the April 14, 2012 attempted Hobbs Act robbery of the Crown Auto Sales. He also pleaded guilty to possessing and brandishing a firearm during the attempted Hobbs Act robbery of the Crown Auto Sales. On February 3, 2014, Chief U.S. District Judge Frank D. Whitney sentenced Corey Miller to serve 11 years in prison, to be followed by five years of supervised release.

In January 2013, Adonte Young pleaded guilty to possessing and discharging a firearm and aiding and abetting the same, in relation to the April 13, 2012 robbery of the PNC Bank on East Boulevard. On March 31, 2014, Chief U.S. District Judge Frank D. Whitney sentenced Young to 10 years in prison, to be followed by five years of supervised release.

Humphrey remains in federal custody and will be turned to the custody of the Federal Bureau of Prisons upon designation of a federal facility. All federal sentences are served without the possibility of parole.

The investigation was handled by the FBI’s Safe Streets Task Force and CMPD. The prosecution for the government was handled by Assistant U.S. Attorney Elizabeth F. Greene of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Charlotte.

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