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Photo Gallery 15

In Your Community: Photos

Charlotte

In July, the Charlotte FBI’s Evidence Response Team (ERT) participated in the Central Piedmont Community College Forensic Kids Kamp featuring upcoming 6th through 12th graders. During the event, students took part in exercises that include techniques used in forensic laboratory and crime scene processing. Members of the Evidence Response Team demonstrated various crime scene investigation techniques, including laser trajectory, alternate light source, electro-static dust lifters, and students were able to practice developing and lifting fingerprints, along with casting and molding shoe impressions.

In July, the Charlotte FBI’s Evidence Response Team (ERT) participated in the Central Piedmont Community College Forensic Kids Kamp featuring upcoming 6th through 12th graders. During the event, students took part in exercises that include techniques used in forensic laboratory and crime scene processing. Members of the Evidence Response Team demonstrated various crime scene investigation techniques, including laser trajectory, alternate light source, electro-static dust lifters, and students were able to practice developing and lifting fingerprints, along with casting and molding shoe impressions.

Norfolk

Norfolk Church

In July, the Norfolk FBI office held a Junior Special Agent Program at New Oak Grove Baptist Church, Virginia Beach. Approximately 15 students participated in the program, which focused on sharing, responsibility, and the characteristics of being a good citizen, and included an object lesson on serving the community of Virginia Beach by planting flowers that were provided by the Norfolk Citizens’ Academy Alumni Association (shown above). The Junior Special Agent Program was part of a community outreach effort by New Oak Grove Baptist Church leaders, the Virginia Beach Public Schools, NASA, and other community volunteers. The outreach project also involved a summer reading academy to promote literacy among African-American males in the Virginia Beach area.

San Diego

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Recently, employees of the San Diego FBI office participated in the inaugural “Finish Chelsea’s Run” event in that city’s Balboa Park. The event honored the life of Chelsea King, a 17-year-old high school student from Poway, CA, murdered while on a run in 2010. The FBI played a significant role in the investigation. Numerous Bureau employees ran in the recent event and other representatives from the field office staffed a special booth and handed out child ID kits and information about online safety for children (above photos).

Portland

Portland Community Outreach

The Portland FBI office recently kicked off its second annual Multi-Cultural Youth Leadership Academy, which will run for five weeks this summer. The purpose of the academy is to develop young leaders and expose them to diverse cultures and to law enforcement. More than 35 high school students are attending the program, which focuses on everything from communicating across cultures and team-building to law enforcement awareness and leadership. It’s sponsored by the Portland FBI’s Multi-Cultural Advisory Committee (MCAC), a diverse group of community leaders committed to enhancing communication with the FBI. In addition to learning about the FBI through presentations from SWAT and special agent bomb technicians, students will also be exposed to a wide variety of other careers, and will also meet agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

“By bringing diverse groups of youth together, they can see that there is more similarity than there is difference among them,” said Ty Okamura, Portland MCAC member. “Hopefully, by them forming relationships, we will be able to go out and work on diversity and equity and helping everybody understand cultures.” After his first day in the program, participant Dalton Capps said he was excited to continue building friendships with his classmates. “I think it’s kind of cool that different cultures can come together and work as a team,” the 17-year-old said, “and I think that this helps you develop life skills that will help me in the future.” Recent high school graduate Nate Tan attended the program last year, and had such a positive experience that he opted to come back this year as mentor.

02.11.11

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